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Tuesday, July 07, 2015
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U.S. Rep. Todd Young, R-Bloomington, is preparing to enter the U.S. Senate race later this month. (HPI Photo by Brian A. Howey)
U.S. Rep. Todd Young, R-Bloomington, is preparing to enter the U.S. Senate race later this month. (HPI Photo by Brian A. Howey)
Monday, July 06, 2015 1:40 PM
By BRIAN A. HOWEY

INDIANAPOLIS - Just days before he makes a presumptive Republican U.S. Senate bid official, U.S. Rep. Todd Young scorched the fundraising circuit, preparing to post $1,024,908 for the second quarter.

Entering the quarter with $1.1 million cash on hand, Young will likely start his Senate campaign with close to $2 million cash on hand. For historical perspective, Young’s dialing for dollars acumen rates with two other prodigious Hoosier U.S. Senate fundraisers, Republican Sen. Dick Lugar and Democrat Sen. Evan Bayh. In other off-year cycles, Lugar ranked second with $973,853 in the 2011 April quarterly and fourth with $911,584 in the 2011 July quarterly. Bayh posted $946,298 in the 2003 July quarterly, and $863,704 in the 2003 April quarterly.

Given the Senate race speculation, it's worth noting that for Senate races in Indiana, the most a non-incumbent reported raising in an off-year quarter was Joe Donnelly, who raised just $453,122 on his 2011 July Quarterly report. Donnelly represented the 2nd CD at the time, but won the U.S. Senate race in 2012, defeating Republican Indiana Treasurer Richard Mourdock in a U.S. Senate race that drew a combined $50 million between the two nominees, Lugar who lost to Mourdock in the primary, and more than $30 million from super PACs.
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  • By BRIAN A. HOWEY
    NASHVILLE, Ind. – Historical karma seemed to flow out of every American pore last week, with South Carolina at the epicenter. Following the almost unfathomable atrocity at the Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston the week before, what the world witnessed in this bloody aftermath was a brand of Christianity where the faithful walked the walk, and talked the talk, in phrases we hear in a political context even up here in the north. The families of the victims, confronting the pathetic shooter Dylann Storm Roof at his arraignment, revealed a stunning power of forgiveness that should live as an heroic example for the ages. Growing up in Northern Indiana, I was a faithful adherent to President Lincoln and was a Civil War aficionado. I dutifully observed at 7:22 a.m. April 15, 1965, the 100th anniversary of the Great Emancipator’s death before heading to school. I was about as Yankee as you could get. Yet it was my church, Main Street United Methodist in Peru, Ind., that opened my heart to the people of South Carolina. Our Methodist Youth Fellowship group performed annual work trips over spring break, and for three years in the early 1970s, we traveled south of Charleston to Yonges Island near Edisto Beach, where we did work projects with the local African-American Methodist Church. 
  • By CRAIG DUNN
    KOKOMO – Pvt. Abram J. Buckles looked forward to the coming fight. Buckles thirsted for all the honor and glory he’d seen others get; impatiently he sought the chance to do his duty. He thought he knew how he should seek it. “I had always had a great anxiety to carry the flag of my regiment and did not know how I could get the place of color-bearer, unless by serving in the guard until I could see a proper chance to pick the flag up, should the color-bearer be killed or wounded,” he later recounted. As Buckles drifted off to sleep that evening, with full stomach and singleness of purpose, he could not have dreamed what the next day would hold. There would be plenty of opportunity for glory in Pennsylvania, in whatever form it was defined.
        
     
  • By MAUREEN HAYDEN
    INDIANAPOLIS – Running for statewide office isn’t easy when you have little name recognition among Indiana’s 4.8 million voters. Just ask Eric Holcomb, who started campaigning in March for next year’s U.S. Senate election. In a Howey Politics Indiana poll conducted in late April by Bellwether Research, 62 percent of voters said they’d never heard of Holcomb. Those voters won’t go to the polls for months. So Holcomb is going to them. In the first 30 days of his campaign, he traveled to events in 30 cities and towns. He’s pledged to visit all 92 counties before county fair season ends in August. That’s on top of a promise to shoot a basketball in a high school gym in every county, a goal that you can see he’s well on the way to achieving if you scan his Facebook page. Holcomb says the pace is exhausting but exhilarating. “Every time you go somewhere and talk to people, not just about their problems but about what they think are solutions, it fuels the rest of your day,” he said. 
  • By JACK COLWELL
     SOUTH BEND – What happened to that prominent political figure in neighboring Illinois was surprising. Consequences are serious. Dennis Hastert? No. This is about Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner. He’s the one who told the Chicago Tribune editorial board that he intends to “rip the economic guts out of Indiana.” Indiana Gov. Mike Pence helped Rauner toward that goal in promoting what was ridiculed nationally as a Hoosier freedom-to-discriminate law. But this isn’t about the silliness of these neighboring states trying to steal jobs from each other instead of working together for the economic good of both. Maybe Rauner’s threat of “coming after Indiana big time” is understandable after Indiana sought to steal jobs with billboards asking Illinois employers if they were “Illinoid by higher taxes.” The surprise was a unanimous decision of the politically split Illinois Supreme Court. Consequences are serious for Rauner, the Republican governor, and the Democratic-controlled Illinois legislature. 
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Cubs v. Sox
Chicago White Sox vs Chicago Cubs - Round 1 (Craig Robinson vs Nick Offerman)
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  • Harrison crosses Indy ballot access signature threshold
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Rev. Charles Harrison is now prepared to throw an interesting wrench into the Indianapolis mayoral race. Allies of the United Methodist pastor filed more than 6,600 signatures to gain ballot access as an independent last week. Sources with the Marion County Voter Registration have confirmed 3,200 signatures, with another 150 pages yet to be counted, meaning Harrison qualifies for ballot access. “Once again, I am humbled and incredibly blessed that so many folks want me to run for mayor of Indianapolis,” Harrison said this morning.
     
  • HPI Analysis: A riveting week that changed America
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY
        
    INDIANAPOLIS – In a riveting 24-hour period last week, Americans saw the U.S. Supreme Court reaffirm Obamacare, then legalize same-sex marriage in all 50 states. A few hours later at the funeral for South Carolina State Sen. Clementa Pinckney, the full frontal assault on the Confederate battle flag continued, quickly spreading from President Obama’s citation of the flag as racist, to a similar assessment from Republican Jeb Bush, to retailers such as eBay, Amazon and Walmart, to the Alabama statehouse where Gov. Robert Bentley ordered its removal from the heart of Dixie. It was a stunning week that changed America in ways rarely witnessed at such a pace. While Congress and state legislatures remain mostly inert as the general public evolves quickly on social issues, it was the Supreme Court and the corporate community that decisively moved the needle. What remains to be seen is whether this evolution folds seamlessly into American culture, or whether this is only the calm before various groups on the social right regroup and prepare for other fights along other picket lines.
        
     
  • Horse Race: Thomas continues to ponder GOP challenge to Pence
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Indianapolis auto dealer Bob Thomas is still pondering entry into the Republican primary, and perhaps even an independent gubernatorial bid. “It is still under consideration,” Thomas told HPI on Tuesday. “But taking on a sitting governor is a huge undertaking. I don’t want to get into a bloody primary and then give the seat to the Democrats.” Thomas began pondering a challenge to Gov. Pence following the Religious Freedom Restoration Act episode last April. Thomas said that he is talking with Republicans about the race. “I’m talking to the adults in the party,” he said. “Everybody thinks the same way. They are scared to death this guy is going to get beat in November.” Thomas is looking at mid-July to make a decision.
     
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  • Coats prefers no Iran deal to a bad one
    “I’m deeply concerned that this administration is simply trying to get a deal at any price. A bad deal [with Iran] is worse than no deal.” - U.S. Sen. Dan Coats, on Sunday Morning Futures with Maria Bartiromo on Fox News discussing the latest on U.S. negotiations with Iran. Secretary of State John Kerry announced that the negotiations are “hanging in the balance” with Tuesday as a deadline.
     



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