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Tuesday, November 25, 2014
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Indiana mayors expected to seek reelection include Anderson Republican Kevin Smith (top left), Democratic Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski, Fort Wayne Democrat Tom Henry (second row, left) mayors Peter Buttigieg (D) of South Bend, Greg Goodnight of Kokomo (D), Duke Bennett of Terre Haute (R) and Lloyd Winnecke of Evansville (R), Gary Democrat Karen Freeman-Wilson, Carmel Republican Jim Brainard and Hammond Democrat Thomas McDermott Jr.
Indiana mayors expected to seek reelection include Anderson Republican Kevin Smith (top left), Democratic Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski, Fort Wayne Democrat Tom Henry (second row, left) mayors Peter Buttigieg (D) of South Bend, Greg Goodnight of Kokomo (D), Duke Bennett of Terre Haute (R) and Lloyd Winnecke of Evansville (R), Gary Democrat Karen Freeman-Wilson, Carmel Republican Jim Brainard and Hammond Democrat Thomas McDermott Jr.
Thursday, November 20, 2014 10:39 AM
By BRIAN A. HOWEY

INDIANAPOLIS – Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski and West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis are the latest incumbents to signal they will seek reelection in 2015. With the mid-term elections over, mayoral races across Indiana are beginning to take shape. In Indianapolis, all eyes are on State Sen. Jim Merritt, who is pouring through election results since 1999 to gauge whether he can be competitive against Democrat Joe Hogsett or Ed DeLaney. A new name surfacing in GOP circles is Councilman Jefferson Shreve. In Bloomington where Mayor Mark Kruzan announced last week he would not seek a fourth term, there is speculation that former IVY Tech chancellor John Whikehart is mulling a run. Kruzan appointed Whikehart deputy mayor and has hinted that he has a successor in mind.

Here are how other mayoral races are beginning to shape up for 2015:
    
Anderson: Republican Mayor Kevin Smith regained the office he lost in 2007, defeating Democrat Mayor Kris Ockomon 6,030 to 5,626, and a rematch is likely. Ockomon faced a number of controversies but was cleared of any criminal violations.
    
Angola: Mayor Dick Hickman announced earlier this month he will seek another term in office in 2015.
    
Bedford: Independent Mayor Shawna Girgis will seek a third term. She is overseeing a $19 million downtown revitalization project after Bedford was selected as a Stellar Community in 2013.
    
Bloomington:  Mayor Kruzan won’t seek a fourth term. Kruzan told WFIU’s “Ask the Mayor” program last week, “When I thought about it, I realized only one other mayor has served more years than I have and there’s a reason for that. You have a short shelf life for being mayor and for me, it’s been 30 years in elected politics. I’ve just been blessed by this community.” With Mayor Kruzan opting out of a reelection bid, this could open up a competitive Democratic primary. A new name surfacing his Whikehart, who Kruzan appointed deputy mayor. John Hamilton, nephew of former congressman Lee Hamilton, ran unsuccessfully against Kruzan in the 2011 Democratic primary, losing 3,507 to 2361. “I haven’t thought about that. It’s a good time to digest this and thank him for his service,” Hamilton told the Bloomington Herald-Times. “I’m proud to have run four years ago and talked about issues that are important to Bloomington, but I’m not thinking about that right now.” Monroe County Councilman Rick Dietz told the Herald-Times, “Yes, I am giving it some consideration.”
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  • By MORTON J. MARCUS
    INDIANAPOLIS - Good education is expensive. To control costs and maintain or improve quality, today’s leading hobby is to develop and advocate plans to reform education. Many people see reform as necessary to make education the route to wealth rather than the pathway to citizenship. In this way America has departed from its origins. We’ve had numerous select committees study everything from pre-K to post-graduate programs to detail the problems. Without admitting the irony, they also assert that tomorrow’s world will require a work force certified to be job-ready and experienced in fields we cannot imagine today.  Then, luckily, they discovered the shield of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) as protection from the foreign forces seeking to replace America as the world’s leading nation. However, this drive to perfect society could not retain its verve and virtue against erosion by the tears of those excluded from STEM. That’s why we now have STEAM which includes the Arts.  In response to this campaign to transform education, I have become an advocate of E-CASH, which stands for Education in Communication, Arts, Science and History. E-CASH prepares people for citizenship, not for being diligent automatons in the work force. 
  • By RICH JAMES
    MERRILLVILLE – Just when the state’s beleaguered Democrats needed a lift, the Indiana Chamber of Commerce delivered. When the chamber announced this week that its legislative priority will be making the superintendent of public instruction an appointed rather than elected position, Democrats were aghast. While they likely won’t admit it, Democrats also were smiling. The Republican-dominated chamber had just given Democrats a solid campaign issue for 2016 when Hoosiers will pick a new governor and all 100 members of the House. But the chamber proposal put Republican lawmakers in a precarious position. The question is whether Republicans want to anger Hoosier voters or the state chamber. Neither is a good proposition. Republicans are still seething over the ouster of Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Bennett by Democrat Glenda Ritz in 2012. 
  • By MICHAEL HICKS
    MUNCIE – Dr. Jonathan Gruber is a well-regarded health economist who created a micro-simulation model used for health care policy. It should come as no surprise that many economics professors are called upon to help with the development of public policy. After all, despite its elegance and rigor, economics is a practical discipline and economic models offer a great deal of insight into almost any policy. The process typically involves using a mathematical model to better understand the effects of a proposed policy proposal. One example of such a model is a micro-simulation. These are often used to explain the effects of a tax change on different groups such as households of different ages, sizes and incomes.  Over the years, I have done a fair bit of this myself, including work for three Democratic and four Republican state governors. In no instance was I asked to help hide an effect of the law or to deceive voters. That brings us to the sad case of Professor Jonathan Gruber. 
  • By CRAIG DUNN
    KOKOMO – Imagine your college alma mater losing 600 games in a row and keeping the coach.  Imagine it raining for 18,250 days in a row and not going out to buy an umbrella.  Imagine a thief breaking into your home every night for 50 years and not buying a burglar alarm or a gun.  Imagine going to the same dry cleaner every day for 50 years and being told that your laundry would be done tomorrow. Unless your alma mater is Indiana University, it’s hard to imagine any of these things.  And yet, in another amazing string of metaphors, these things pale in comparison to our attitudes about the 50-year-old war on poverty. It’s time to hoist the white flag, lay down our weapons and begin making the long hike back to Baghdad.  We have irretrievably lost the war on poverty and it’s time to admit it and start all over.  We have met the enemy and he is us!  We have consistently dropped nukes on ourselves in our quest to win the unwinnable war and have jeopardized the economic futures of our children and grandchildren in the process. 
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President Obama's immigration address
President Obama announces his immigration executive order on Nov. 20 in this address to the nation.
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  • Analysis: The coming education legislative session
    By MATTHEW BUTLER
        
    INDIANAPOLIS – After both the Chamber of Commerce Legislative Preview and Organization Day earlier this week, all indications suggest public education will be overwhelmingly the topic of debate and compromise for this upcoming budgetary session. “I would like to see this is as an education session,” Senate President David Long told the media Tuesday. “There’s no more critical strategic investment for us this session of the General Assembly than K-12 education and K-12 education funding,” Speaker Brian Bosma said during his opening address. The school funding formula is on the table as are school corporation consolidation and, indeed, the very future of the state superintendent of public instruction remaining an elected office. It’s unlikely these issues will be resolved along tidy party-line votes. It gives this session the potential, in spite of two Republican super majorities, to be more contentious (and exciting) than observers might otherwise predict.
     
  • Hoosier Survey finds jobs, crime, education top priorities
    By MAUREEN HAYDEN
    CNHI Statehouse Bureau

        
    INDIANAPOLIS -- Jobs, crime and schools are the top concerns of Hoosiers, and they top the priorities that Hoosiers want lawmakers to focus on during the next legislative session. Three of four people surveyed for the annual Hoosier Survey said job creation is the most important task of the General Assembly when it convenes in January.  That comes even as Indiana’s unemployment rate, at 5.7 percent, continues to drop below the national average. “Jobs always end up on the top of the list,” said Ball State University political scientist Ray Scheele, who helped design the poll. “The economy is still the highest priority in the minds of Hoosiers.”
     
  • Clark won't seek GOP Indy mayoral nomination
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Murray Clark will not seek the Republican Indianapolis mayoral nomination. “When Greg Ballard announced, to the disappointment of many including me, his decision not to seek a third term, my wife Janet and I began to consider whether I should run for mayor of Indianapolis,” Clark, a former state senator, lieutenant governor nominee and Indiana Republican Chairman said. “This is not our first time evaluating a campaign for mayor, and having looked at the opportunity, we know well the commitment that is required not only to run, but also to lead. However, despite my love for Indianapolis and its promising future, returning to public life is not the right decision for us and our family at this point in time. My work at Faegre Baker Daniels is interesting, challenging and enjoyable. Both Janet and I still greatly enjoy and find rewarding our volunteer work in the community, and we are blessed to have four young Clark adults entering very exciting times in their lives seemingly every day. This endeavor would require setting all of that aside for the next 12 to 60 months.”

     
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  • Daniels describes 2012 potential outcome in 'Run, Mitch, Run'
    "My own best guess is that we would have captured the nomination but lost to an Obama campaign that had several powerful advantages - a monolithic, unpersuadable base of black and strongly liberal voters: an electoral college head start through its ownership of a few big coastal states; a clear superiority in its grasp of the political uses of social media; and its track record of success in personally demonizing its opponents. Still, the thing had a shot." - Purdue University President Mitch Daniels, describing a potential 2012 presidential campaign in the book by Don Cogman “Run, Mitch, Run.” 
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Supt

Should Indiana's superintendent of public instruction be elected, or appointed by the governor?


 

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