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Thursday, September 18, 2014
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Members of the Indiana Congressional delegation appeared at Capitol Visitors Center at an Indiana Chamber of Commerce "Fly-In" event. All 11 Members attended the event, including (from left) U.S. Reps. Susan Brooks, Andre Carson, Larry Bucshon, and U.S. Sens. Dan Coats and Joe Donnelly. (HPI Photo by Brian A. Howey)
Members of the Indiana Congressional delegation appeared at Capitol Visitors Center at an Indiana Chamber of Commerce "Fly-In" event. All 11 Members attended the event, including (from left) U.S. Reps. Susan Brooks, Andre Carson, Larry Bucshon, and U.S. Sens. Dan Coats and Joe Donnelly. (HPI Photo by Brian A. Howey)
Thursday, September 18, 2014 7:17 AM

By BRIAN A. HOWEY

WASHINGTON - Indiana’s Congressional delegation was split on a House bill that would train and arm Syrian rebels on Wednesday. The House passed the measure 273 to 156 and the Senate will vote today. There were 159 Republicans and 114 Democrats supporting the bill and 71 Republicans and 85 Democrats voting against. It found House Speaker John Boehner and Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi backing the bill, but opposition came from both liberal Democrats and GOP hawks.

Republicans U.S. Reps. Todd Young and Marlin Stutzman voted against the measure along with Democrat U.S. Rep. Pete Visclosky. The rest of the Indiana House members voted for, and Sens. Dan Coats and Joe Donnelly indicated they would support the measure on Thursday.

U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks, R-Indianapolis, said she voted for the measure “because the whole world is watching. ISIL is watching.” She noted that there are now “31,000 terrorists, many with Western and U.S. passports” said the legislation will give President Obama until Dec. 11 to make many determinations.

Rep. Young, R-Bloomington, voted against the measure, telling Hoosiers attending a Capitol Hill Indiana Chamber “Fly-In” that he had “concerns about the process” and acknowledged many Members were “conflicted” about the strategy. “We’ve heard conflicting statements” from the administration, Young said, noting that President Obama has vowed not to use U.S. ground troops while the Joint Chiefs of Staff could not “recall the number of ground troops” already involved. “I was encouraged some of my concerns were addressed,” Young said.  

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly, D-Granger, explained, “This groups says their plan is to kill Americans. I take them at their word. This group is a zero sum group.” Donnelly said he wanted to give President Obama options to combat the growing army that he said could eventually threaten Jordan and Saudi Arabia if left unchecked.

U.S. Sen. Dan Coats, R-Carmel, added, “We’re dealing with an organization with the likes we’ve never seen before. I support the president to go after ISIL wherever they are. I will be supporting it tomorrow. This is a real defining moment for the country.”

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  • By CRAIG DUNN
    KOKOMO – Cecil E. Roberts, United Mineworkers of America international president, was immensely proud when he strode to the podium the day after the Kentucky presidential primary in 2008 and announced his union’s endorsement of Barack H. Obama for president of the United States.  Mr. Roberts stated, “Senator Obama shares the values of UMWA members and our families.  He understands and will fight for the needs our members have today and the hopes our members have for a secure future for themselves and their families.” Not content to make merely one misguided statement, Roberts followed up with, “Senator Obama is from a coal state.  Senator Obama will work to ensure the future of American coal and the jobs that go with it.”  Thus spoke Cecil E. Roberts for the 105,000 active and retired coal miners in the United States. Oops! Fast forward to October, 2008, just before the election, Mr. Roberts could not have missed the video recording of an interview given in January to the San Francisco Chronicle where Barack Obama promised to bankrupt any new coal plants.  “Holy blackouts Batman, you mean we endorsed a guy who hates us!”
     
  • By SHAW FRIEDMAN
    LaPORTE – Recent news that the Indiana Toll Road’s operators, Spain’s Cintra and Australia’s Macquarie Group Ltd,. are threatening a bankruptcy filing and that various banks and hedge funds are lining up to protect their interests in bankruptcy court should have Hoosiers scratching their heads in wonderment. Remember the unmistakable promises by our governor at the time, Mitch Daniels, who bragged that his sale (er, 75-year lease) of the toll road to a foreign consortium was the “best deal since Manhattan was sold for beads” and that if the road went belly up, the state could simply take it back. Tell us, where in the fine print is it written that bondholders, banks and lienholders now have to take a back seat to the State of Indiana as we reclaim “our” toll road?  Perhaps, you can spare a minute and give your friend, Attorney General Greg Zoeller, a call and let him know where in the agreement the state’s interests somehow trump those of the bondholders. 
  • By MORTON J. MARCUS
    INDIANAPOLIS – Evan Bayh has made it official: He will not run for governor in 2016. His reason: He could not have the impact he would like to have since the General Assembly will be firmly in the hands of the Republicans. This is consistent with his longterm position as a figurehead rather than a leader of the Democratic Party. In effect, Bayh has conceded political control to Indiana Republicans for the next decade. What an opportunity for Republicans! Now they can be true to themselves over the next few years. Now they can come out in support of toll roads for Indiana.
             
     
  • By BRIAN A. HOWEY
    INDIANAPOLIS – Here’s a viewing assignment:  A July 29 edition of the PBS Frontline series titled “Losing Iraq.” You can watch it by clicking here. I ask you to view this because for the third time in the early years of a century, an American president has had to thrust military force, or the “big stick,” into remnants of the Ottoman Empire to take on rogue armies and navies. President Jefferson found himself dealing with the Barbary pirates terrorizing American shipping in 1801. In 1904, it was President Theodore Roosevelt who reacted to Sherif Mulai Ahmed ibn-Muhammed er Raisuli, Lord of the Rif, who kidnapped American citizens. This brought Roosevelt’s “speak softly and carry a big stick” response. Those two forays were the proverbial picnic compared to what we face today. When I watched “Losing Iraq,” I was filled with anger at the Bush and Obama presidencies. We can’t seem to get anything right in a fight we picked and then walked away.
      
     
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Bayh won't run for governor in 2016
WRTV interviews former governor Evan Bayh after his decision not to run for governor in 2016.
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  • HPI Interview: Bayh talks of his decision, Dem future, middle class
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY
        
    NASHVILLE, Ind. – A couple of hours after former governor Evan Bayh announced he would take a pass on the 2016 gubernatorial race, he conducted this telephone interview with Howey Politics Indiana. Bayh called his decision a “governing one, not a political one,” said he had no plans to ever seek elective office again, and vowed to continue his public service by helping the coming Hillary Clinton presidential campaign, as well as work with academia, foundations and political organizations such as No Labels to improve the lives of Americans and the middle class. HPI: How did you come to your decision to pass on a third term as governor? Bayh: My decision was really a governing one, not a political one. If I was going to run for an office as important as governor, it was because I would have a substantial, positive agenda I thought I had a reasonable prospect of getting done if people put their confidence in me.  Part of this involves somewhat of a walk down memory lane. First of all, the political atmosphere these days has changed. It’s changed in Washington for sure and some of that has affected the Statehouse, too, where things are just more polarized and more partisan than they were back in the day when I had the privilege of being governor. Sure we had our disputes. Sure there were differences, but I think there was more of a willingness to find common ground, to strike principled compromises than is the case today. So the general atmosphere has changed. That’s No. 1.

     
  • HPI Analysis: Daniels' legacy clips second Bayh era
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY
        
    INDIANAPOLIS – In the past generation, Indiana has seen two dynastic political juggernauts generated in Democrat Evan Bayh and Republican Mitch Daniels. In an era of two-party competitiveness at the gubernatorial level, both Bayh and Daniels revived their parties and control of the Statehouse second floor extended beyond their respective two terms in office. What occurred last Friday was, essentially, the latter trumping the former in terms of political legacy.
        
     
  • Evan Bayh won't run in 2016; Gregg, McDermott assess

    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    NASHVILLE, Ind. - Former Indiana Gov. Evan Bayh will not seek third term for governor, telling HPI the decision "was really a governing one, not a political one."
    "After serious consideration, I have decided that I will not be a candidate for Governor in 2016," Bayh said. "I hope that my decision will enable others to step forward and offer their ideas for making Indiana an even better place to live, work and raise a family." The news prompted the two most likely contenders - former 2012 nominee John Gregg and Hammond Mayor Thomas McDermott Jr. - to assess their opportunities. "I am strongly considering a run," Gregg told HPI Friday morning, saying he would make a decision after Election Day in November. "I have a record of getting along with Republicans when I was co-speaker of a 50/50 House. I got along with the Republican Senate." McDermott told HPI, "I am going to absorb this and see what it means for the future. I’m young and time is on our side.” Bayh told HPI on Friday afternoon, "My decision was really a governing one, not a political one."

     

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  • Chairman Zody plots Indiana Democratic comeback
    “You start with some gains this year and try and make some headway. This is a long-term strategy toward regaining majorities in 2020 before the next redistricting occurs.” - Indiana Democratic Chairman John Zody, strategizing his party’s comeback after Republicans forged super majorities in the Indiana House 
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Obama ISIS

Did President Obama make the appropriate case for U.S. and coalition military action against ISIS?


 

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