An image.
Login | Subscribe
Friday, May 06, 2016
An image.
An image.
Gov. Mike Pence campaigned with Sen. Ted Cruz in Marion on Monday, along for another ride on divisive social issues a day before the Cruz campaign collapsed, losing Indiana to Donald Trump in a landslide.
Gov. Mike Pence campaigned with Sen. Ted Cruz in Marion on Monday, along for another ride on divisive social issues a day before the Cruz campaign collapsed, losing Indiana to Donald Trump in a landslide.
Friday, May 06, 2016 1:04 PM

By BRIAN A. HOWEY
    
INDIANAPOLIS – For Gov. Mike Pence, the presidential maelstrom that roared through the state has left him, at least temporarily, twisting, twisting, twisting in the political winds.
    
He found himself in the national glare last weekend, first with his squishy endorsement of the Ted Cruz presidential campaign on Friday, then new NBC/Wall Street Journal/Marist job approval numbers that had him at 43/43%. Those are ominous numbers for an incumbent Republican in the Hoosier state this late in the cycle. They reinforced the fav/unfav numbers in the WTHR/Howey Politics Polls of April 18-21 that had Pence at 44/41% and 71/22% among Republicans. And the right/track wrong/track numbers are equally bad, 44/45% among the general electorate and 61/29% for Republicans. The poll also showed Pence favorability at 59% in the Republican-rich doughnut counties.
    
More bad news? In Hamilton County, more than 10,000 Republicans scratched on the governor’s race in Tuesday’s primary, with 65,902 voting in the U.S. Senate race and only 55,596 in the governor’s race. Granted, Pence was unopposed, but we’re talking about just a mere hand stroke and 10,000 Republicans took a pass. In Vigo County, it was 30% of Republicans taking a pass. Some had to be sending a message. Pence allies remind HPI that the primary is often the “general” election when it comes to local races.
    
The fact that Cruz was resoundingly rejected by Indiana Republican voters on Tuesday, 53-37%, including more than 50% of evangelical voters who are deciding on the presidential race via pocketbook issues over those of abortion and gay rights, is a political problem for the governor. Washington Post columnist Mike Gerson, a former aide to U.S. Sen. Dan Coats and U.S. Rep. Mark Souder, wrote last week that Pence “should be in a dominant position as he campaigns for reelection. The state’s economy is booming. Pence can take credit for the second-largest budget surplus in Indiana history. Yet a recent poll has the governor with less than 50% support and barely ahead of a politically mediocre Democratic challenger."

An image.
  • By CHRIS SAUTTER
    WASHINGTON – It was like old times waiting for election results from Indiana’s primary Tuesday. Hoosier politics is a whole lot more fun when it is relevant nationally. These are some lessons I draw from Tuesday’s election. 1. Message wins elections and Donald Trump’s message resonated with Hoosiers considerably more than Ted Cruz’s. The conventional wisdom several weeks out was that Ted Cruz was a better fit for Indiana’s conservatism than Donald Trump. Instead, Trump’s blue-collar message of strong leadership and getting tough on trade and illegal immigration resonated much more than Cruz’s more narrowly focused hard-line evangelical message. In addition, Cruz’s nakedly political deal with John Kasich and the naming of Carly Fiorina as his vice presidential running mate came across as desperate and undercut his claim that he was the candidate of principle. 2. Trump’s “take no prisoners” style of politics worked.  Most presidential candidates come to negative campaigning reluctantly. Donald Trump embraced it from the start of his campaign as he systematically destroyed his opposition from Jeb Bush to Scott Walker to Ben Carson to Marco Rubio. Trump’s willingness to go on the attack was key to his growing success.
  • By MARK SCHOEFF JR.
    WASHINGTON –  Following his domination of the Indiana Republican primary, Donald Trump is basking in an aura of “maybe.” Now that he’s the presumptive presidential nominee of one of the two major political parties, there’s a 50-50 chance he could win the White House. By Labor Day, the “maybe” is almost surely going to become a “no” for the real estate mogul and reality TV star who offends more people than he inspires - even though he will be running against another candidate, likely Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, whose disapproval rating also exceeds 50 percent. But voter rejection of Trump won’t necessarily translate into down-ballot trouble for Republicans. So far, he appears to have no coattails. Rep. Marlin Stutzman, R-3rd CD, was hoping to ride the anti-establishment Trump wave a win. No matter how toxic Trump makes the political environment, Republicans will certainly maintain control of the House and could hold onto the Senate. Rather than give Young breathing room, this situation presents a challenge for him and other Republican candidates this fall.
  • By CRAIG DUNN
    KOKOMO – Forget about the analysis of the primary races for president, U.S. Senate and congressional races. That’s all fine and good, but I want to talk about an issue while it’s hot; an issue that both Republicans and Democrats can get their hands around and agree on at least one thing. Indiana desperately needs to move our primary election to the early part of the presidential election cycle. For virtually my entire life Indiana has been flown over, walked over, passed over and mostly ignored by the national political elites. We’ve been mostly a super safe state in the Republican electoral column; so safe that Republican presidential candidates rarely stop for much more than a quick cash grab at the Columbia Club. You might get a vice presidential candidate whistle stop visit, but the main attraction spends their time where it is needed. Democrat presidential candidates stop just as infrequently as the Republicans. Why waste your time tilling extremely rocky soil? It has been an amazing experience watching Indiana become the object of affection for Republican and Democrat presidential candidates for the past 10 days. It has been a joy to see all of the big boy national media outlets realize that there is, “more than corn in Indiana.”
  • BY: MARK SOUDER
    FORT WAYNE – From the time Ted Cruz launched his campaign at the legendary gym in Knightstown where the movie “Hoosiers” was filmed, and referred to the “rim” as a “ring,” one had a feeling that our moment in the sun might not go well. Based upon Donald Trump’s strategy, you’d think all of us were still dribbling basketballs everywhere. IU’s Bobby “Night” was trotted out to declare that Trump was the most prepared man ever to be president.  Purdue’s Gene Keady played along.  Notre Dame’s Digger Phelps called Trump “one of the great coaches of this country,” though he did not endorse Trump University as an alternative to Notre Dame. Notre Dame’s embarrassment deepened further when football coach Lou Holtz joined in.  As a Notre Dame alum, I admit that Lou Holtz is at least a nominal friend and hero of mine. But his statement supporting Trump illustrated the silliness of everything that is going on. Holtz: “The main reason I’m endorsing him: I’ve played his golf course, I’ve stayed in his hotel. He does nothing but go first class in everything.  He wants this country to be first class as well.”
  • By JACK COLWELL
    SOUTH BEND – Indiana’s primary election, often too late in presidential nomination selection to count, was billed as having real meaning this time. It did. So, what does it mean nationally for president and for races in Indiana for governor and the U.S. Senate? Republican presidential nomination: Indiana decided it. Donald Trump will be the Republican nominee. Just as billed, it was a “must win” primary for Ted Cruz and the stop-Trump effort. When Cruz was trounced, with Trump sweeping up Indiana delegate commitments for the first ballot at the Republican National Convention, the path to forcing a second ballot and then nominating somebody other than Trump was closed. Cruz, with no path to travel, gave up. Nomination decided. What happens now in remaining states with primaries doesn’t matter. Democratic presidential nomination: Hillary Clinton, though actually with a surer path to nomination than Trump had on the Republican side before Cruz bowed out, failed to knock Bernie Sanders out of the way. She really didn’t try very hard in Indiana, already pivoting toward a general election battle with Trump. Clinton didn’t spend a cent on TV in Indiana (compared to nearly $2 million spent by Sanders) and didn’t spend much time campaigning here either.
An image.
An image.
  • HPI Analysis: An epic and bizarre coda to the Indiana primary
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY
        
    INDIANAPOLIS –  When the dust settled on one of the most bizarre political sequences in modern Indiana history, Hoosier Republican voters had mostly settled the Republican presidential race for Donald Trump while prolonging the primary slog for Hillary Clinton with Bernie Sanders’ 53-47% victory. The Indiana primary ended on a frenzied week-long pace as four candidates and an ex-president courted Hoosiers at more than 50 rallies and retail stops. In the final crescendo, this epic drama became surreal as Donald Trump used a National Enquirer article to allege that Ted Cruz’s father was involved with Lee Harvey Oswald in the assassination of President Kennedy. It came at a time when Republicans took a second, long look at Trump, hoping to see a future president. Instead, they got a tabloid reality star on the verge of a landslide victory who didn’t know when to let up.
        
  • Young defeats Stutzman; Banks, Hollingsworth win open CDs
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Todd Young won an emphatic Republican U.S. Senate primary Tuesday night and will now prepare for a rematch with Democratic Baron Hill. “As a Marine, I can sum it up in one word: Boorah!” Young said in the Victory Ballroom of the Hilton Hotel in Indianapolis Tuesday night. Young was leading Stutzman 67-33% with 87% of Indiana precincts reporting. “I had confidence from the beginning this was going to be a team effort, and you didn’t let me down,” Young told several hundred supporters. “All of you are here today because we share our common sense Hoosier values,” Young said. “This was a hard fought race. I think it’s appropriate we stop, we pause, and we recognize how much we respect Marlin Stutzman.” Young told his supporters, “The world is a dangerous place and you can’t turn your back on the world. You deserve a U.S. Senator who understands that fundamental principle.” He added that “Baron Hill is prepared to put his lobbying career on hold.”
  • Sanders rallies an embattled Hoosier middle class on election eve
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Somewhere in the universe, Eugene Debs was smiling over Monument Circle. There, on a cool, damp election eve, socialist U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders spoke of a revolution before some 10,000 Hoosiers disgusted by the decline of the American middle class. Sanders spoke as the latest NBC/Wall Street Journal/Marist Poll showed him trailing Hillary Clinton in the Indiana Democratic presidential primary 50-46%, a race within the margin of error. Sanders insisted that the margin of financial error for millions of Hoosiers and Americans has vanished. “Hey Indy, are you ready for a revolution?” Sanders said as the statue “Victory” high atop the Soldiers and Sailors Monument rose above him, and yet below the Chase Tower, the Hoosier State's tallest skyscraper. “We have won 17 primaries and caucuses. I have a feeling that with your support we’re going to make it No. 18.” Scanning the crowd filled with young people, Sanders said, “What it means is our ideas are the future of America. Our ideas are the future of the Democratic Party.”

  • Pence campaigns with Cruz in Marion, Fort Wayne

    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - After a weekend of criticism over what was roundly described as a tepid and half-hearted endorsement, Gov. Mike Pence hit the campaign trail with Ted Cruz. The two Republicans worked a large crowd at a Marion restaurant mid-day Monday. Asked about the Pence endorsement, Cruz said, “It’s incredibly important. Every year he’s cut taxes and reduced regulation. We need to bring this type of conservatism to Washington.” As the two Republicans wound through the crowd, Pence was asked about his support of Cruz, “I think this is the time for choosing. It’s wonderful people of Indiana have a chance to play a leading role," Pence said. "My choice is Ted Cruz but I’m really looking forward to the polls opening tomorrow and Indiana getting its say.”
    In an interview a short time later with NBC's Hallie Jackson, Pence said, "I am extremely impressed with his knowledge of the Constitution and the liberties enshrined there, the 2nd Amendment and his commitment to the sanctity of life. All of these are reasons why I have chosen to support Ted Cruz. How Hoosiers across the state are in the process of making up their own minds and Hoosiers have a tendency to do that and I respect that. For me, for my part, I want people to know I am supporting Ted Cruz in the Indiana primary."

  • Hillary assails Trump, Cruz in final pitch to Hoosier voters
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Hillary Clinton made her closing case for a second Indiana Democratic presidential primary victory at an east side Indianapolis park gym Sunday afternoon, vowing to defend Obamacare, push for gun reforms and policies to spur manufacturing growth. It comes as the former senator and secretary of state is leading Bernie Sanders by just 50 to 46% margin in an NBC/Wall Street Journal/Marist Poll released Sunday morning. That poll also showed Republican Donald Trump leading Ted Cruz 49-34%. Clinton poked at her potential Republican rivals, saying that violence at Donald Trump rallies reminded her of a “faraway country,” adding, “Enough! Enough!” She ridiculed Ted Cruz’s plan to patrol Muslim neighborhoods as an anti-terror method, calling it “dangerous talk.” She reminded the crowd of about 500 at Douglass Park that it wasn’t so long ago that 23 million jobs were created, wages were rising and crime was falling. “I remember the 1990s when a Clinton was president,” the former First Lady said as the crowd erupted in cheers. “What happened? Well, one thing that happened was we got a Republican president. We ended up in one of the worst financial crisis.”
An image.
  • Pence will support, campaign for Donald Trump
    "I'm going to campaign hard for the Republican nominee because Indiana needs a partner in the White House. I just think it was very exciting to see presidential candidates in both parties traveling all across the state of Indiana and I look forward to supporting our presumptive nominee. I think Donald Trump will do very well in the Hoosier State.” - Gov. Mike Pence, announcing that he will back presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, while in Terre Haute on Thursday. U.S. Rep. Todd Rokita also announced that he will back Trump.
An image.
HPI Video Feed
1st Pence reelection 'Wake Up' TV ad
The reelection campaign of Gov. Mike Pence released his first TV ad.

Gregg begins INGov TV ad campaign
Democrat John Gregg begins his TV ad campaign and plans to stay on the air through November.

1
2 videos
An image.
An image.
Super delegates

Should Indiana's Democratic super delegates back Bernie Sanders over Hillary Clinton since he won the Indiana primary?


 

An image.



The HPI Breaking News App
is now available for iOS & Android!










An image.
Home | Login | Subscribe | About | Contact
© 2016 Howey Politics, All Rights Reserved • Software © 1998 - 2016 1up!