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Monday, October 20, 2014
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Monday, October 20, 2014 4:11 PM
By BRIAN A. HOWEY

INDIANAPOLIS - Since Howey Politics began publishing 20 years ago, one of our favorite features is the “Quote of the Week.”

So in the classic story that literally writes itself, here are some of the best quotes over the past decades from Hoosier politicians, citizens and journalists with the original HPI publication date:

“As it’s been pointed out to me on many occasions, reformers are burned at the stake and then statues are built to memorialize them later on.” – Indianapolis Mayor Bart Peterson, Nov. 17, 2005.

“It is intolerable that a court in this free society would ask a person to censure the prayer they offer in the tradition of their faith.” – House Speaker Brian Bosma, following a federal court ruling on prayer in the Indiana House, Dec. 8, 2005.

“What a complete charlatan. I was always taught such conduct could be grounds for disbarment.”  – State Sen. Mike Delph, Tweeting about Attorney General Greg Zoeller, April 23, 2013.

“The red line means going to war. This is very dangerous because we may be aiding people who will use the arms against us and our allies.”  – Former Sen. Dick Lugar on Syrian chemical attack, Aug. 22, 2013.

“I’m trying to move the state forward. Some things are more important than reelection.” – State Rep. Troy Woodruff, after his vote to break the DST deadlock, May 4, 2005.

“Only in America do people have the opportunity to be wrong on an issue.” Eric Miller of Advance America, at a Statehouse pro-marriage-amendment rally, March 10, 2005.
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  • By BRIAN A. HOWEY
    INDIANAPOLIS - There was a simple, but troubling question for U.S. Sen. Dan Coats. “Could Baghdad fall to ISIS?” The Indiana Republican who sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee didn’t hesitate long before an even more troubling response. “I think it could,” Coats said. “They’re on the outskirts. And if that happens, it’s over.” The premise of the question was backed up by Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, a top military adviser to President Obama, who said on ABC’s “This Week” last Sunday, “I have no doubt there will be days when they use indirect fire into Baghdad,” Dempsey said. “The government of Iraq, which is moving but has not yet achieved a narrative that would cause the 20 million Sunnis who live between Damascus and Baghdad to believe that their future is with the government of Iraq, in the case of Iraqis, and certainly the Syrian regime is not reaching out to the Sunni population in Syria.” A few days later, Dempsey told CNN, “I don't see that happening. I’m confident we can assist the Iraqis to keep Baghdad from falling." File this under the category of bad decisions of the past compounding into a potential geopolitical catastrophe.  
  • By BRIAN A. HOWEY
    INDIANAPOLIS – The 12-year-old Hoosier boy was just as interested in Indiana politics as this professional journalist is today. Attending an Associated Press Managing Editors meeting with my parents at South Bend in 1968, I watched a joint appearance between U.S. Sen. Birch Bayh and his Republican challenger Bill Ruckleshaus. The newsmen thought it would be nice to let the kid ask the first question, and this is what I asked: What would you do about pollution and the environment? Ruckleshaus observed that it was the first time the subject had come up. He went on to become the first head of the Environmental Protection Agency before President Nixon fired him during the Saturday Night Massacre. A couple of years later, Betty Rendell helped me interview Speaker Doc Bowen at the Miami County Lincoln dinner. “Are you going to run for governor?” I asked, holding a balky RCA cassette tape recorder. Doc responded, “I have to admit I’ve been thinking about it." I come from newspaper and farming families: My father’s side from Michigan City and Hobart in The Region; my mother’s from Dearborn County near Aurora, and later from Batesville and Liberty.  
  • By RICH JAMES
    MERRILLVILLE – When incumbent Republican legislators started canceling debates with Democratic challengers a few weeks back, speculation was that they didn’t want to have to defend the GOP agenda on a number of levels. It now is becoming clearer that the issue that led to the Republican cancellations was education. Republicans have come under fire on a number of fronts when it comes to the education agenda. Democrats have criticized the GOP for freely shifting education money from public schools to charter schools. Democrats have rapped Gov. Mike Pence for his assault on Democratic Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz, have expressed displeasure with Pence for forming his own education board at great expense to the taxpayers and have assailed Republicans for taking away many of the rights teacher unions have held over the years. Democrats have knocked the GOP for not doing something to improve the outdated school funding formula. And, the list goes on. 
  • By JACK COLWELL
    SOUTH BEND - Remember the government shutdown? Disgust with Republicans in Congress for that political debacle. The scheme to defund and kill Obamacare that disrupted services for millions and hindered economic recovery. It was sure to bring a Democratic landslide this fall, ensuring continued Democratic control of the Senate and ending Republican control in the House. Right? Wrong. Remember the rollout of sign-ups for Obamacare? The disgust with President Obama for that computer debacle. The start of promised easy access to affordable health care being anything but easy, darn near impossible. It was sure to bring a Republican landslide this fall, enabling Republicans to win a solid Senate majority and greatly expand the GOP majority in the House. Right? Wrong. As the election looms, most indications are that this will not be a landslide election for either party. 
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Gov. Pence on HPI's 20th Anniversary
Gov. Mike Pence pays tribute to Howey Politics Indiana's 20th Anniversary in this special video.
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  • 20th Anniversary: HPI reader survey
    INDIANAPOLIS - In the survey we took of HPI subscribers, 273 people participated. Here is how they rated the various categories for governor, U.S. Senator, Congress, Indiana General Assembly, mayors, political leaders and lobbyists:

    Indiana Governors: 1. Mitch Daniels, 2. Otis “Doc” Bowen, 3. Evan Bayh, 4. Robert Orr, 5. Frank O’Bannon, 6. Mike Pence, 7. Joe Kernan
  • Horse Race: Little traction for CD challengers on FEC reports
    INDIANAPOLIS – Once again, this quarter showed that challengers aren’t gaining any traction in fundraising. Add to that the lack of general activity from challengers, and it isn’t likely they’ll get much traction at the ballot box, either.  As the saying goes, “In politics, money only matters when you don’t have any.”  Case in point: Eight of the nine incumbents have already raised over $1 million for the cycle, while challengers in eight of the nine races have raised less than $100K.  The only challenger to get past that threshold, Joe Bock in the 2nd District, has seen Rep. Jackie Walorski more than double his total haul ($1.84 million to $743K). Rep. Todd Young is the big winner for this quarter, bringing in $355K. Rep. Susan Brooks wasn’t far behind at $340K, followed closely by Walorski at $323K. Those three out-distanced the pack, with the next highest coming in at $259K.  
  • Howey Politics 20th Anniversary Edition: Generational Power 50
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS – Journalists write the so-called first draft of history. Some of us join the true historians, step back and reevaluate the early takes. With Howey Politics Indiana observing its 20th Anniversary this year, it was appropriate to take that step back, go through past editions and make some new assessments. In this anniversary edition, we not only did that, but we did it with almost 300 HPI subscribers participating. This anniversary edition gave us a similar but broader retrospective. My professional journalism career began in 1978. So while The Howey Political Report began publishing in August 1994, I decided to take this exercise back to the origins of my own professional career and the advent of the Bowen governorship, a new period where the chief executive could run for reelection.
        
     

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  • Sen. Coats says Baghdad could fall to ISIS
    “I think it could. They’re on the outskirts. And if that happens, it’s over. Then you’d have a state run by terrorists.” - U.S. Sen. Dan Coats, to Howey Politics Indiana when we asked whether ISIS could take Baghdad. Coats sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee. Several news agencies are reporting that ISIS is eight miles from the airport and that suicide bombers have infiltrated the Iraqi capital city. Read Brian Howey's column below and left for more perspective from Sen. Coats. 
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Toll Road

Should the Indiana Toll Road revert back to the state since the bankrupt leasor is not living up to maintenance agreements?


 

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