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Monday, June 25, 2018
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  • Rep. Brooks questions for Trump administration on child immigrants
    “Many questions remain surrounding the policies of taking children from their parents. While I am in support of defending our nation’s borders and am encouraged by the president’s recent executive order, many questions still remain surrounding the policies of taking children from their parents at the border. In this letter, I joined my colleagues to ask the responsible executive agencies to clarify their policies and procedures when it comes to separating families so we can better understand how to fix this disturbing situation at the border as quickly as possible.” - U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks, describing a letter she and 40 House colleagues wrote to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, HHS Sec. Alex Azar, and Homeland Security Sec. Kirstjen Nielsen. She was the only Member of the Indiana delegation to sign the letter.
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  • 30 years after, climate change realities

    During the drought of 1988, I covered that historic heat wave and agriculture issues for the Elkhart Truth. That was the year of dozens of 100 degree days, and I covered hay auctions in LaGrange County, and forged a relationship with NOAA’s Climate Analysis Center in Maryland, which was created after Mother Nature rolled “triple doubles” in 1977, 1978 (remember our blizzard), and 1979.

    On June 23, 1988 NASA climate scientist James Hansen issued a stark warning to the Senate energy committee: Human-caused global warming was already detectable, and would grow far worse with time, Axios reports. He was right. Since 1988, the Lower 48 states have warmed at a rate of 5.2 degrees Fahrenheit per century, and the globe has warmed at a rate of 3.2 degrees Fahrenheit per century, NOAA found. The five warmest years on record have all occurred in the 2010s. 

    What do Hoosier farmers tell me these days? They see more extreme weather events. We tend to have moist winters and early brings. Rain turns off in mid-July and recent late summers are hot and dry. Purdue climate experts are warning that we are going to be a warmer state in the coming decades. In an analysis on how states will fare in GDP due to climate change, Indiana will be impacted in the -10 to zero range. - Brian A. Howey, publisher

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