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Thursday, November 14, 2019 11:58 AM
By BRIAN A. HOWEY

INDIANAPOLIS  — South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg has joined former Vice President Joe Biden, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders at the top of the leaderboard in the third Monmouth University Poll of the 2020 Iowa Democratic caucuses. Buttigieg’s gains since the summer have been across the board, with increasing support coming from nearly every demographic group.  Regardless, less than one-third of likely caucusgoers say that they are firmly set on their choice of candidate and most would not be too disappointed if they had to switch their support.  
  • HPI Analysis: Holcomb legacy rests on post-Dobbs; special session delayed until July 25
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS  – When the Indiana General Assembly convenes in special session to consider tax rebates and new abortion restrictions on July 25, it sets the stage for perhaps the most compelling sequence in Eric Holcomb’s governorship. Gov. Holcomb might be remembered for his handling of COVID-19 pandemic, his robust Next Level road building program, “inflation relief” or continuing state tax cuts, but probably not. Two-term governors are usually remembered for the last big thing they did, like Gov. Robert Orr’s A-Plus education reforms of 1987 or Gov. Mitch Daniels’ 2011 teacher evaluation and options for families (full public school choice). The direction the legislature and Gov. Holcomb go on the abortion issue is one that will likely be their enduring legacy. According to informed and reliable sources, the unsettled abortion bill is expected to start in the Senate, with State Sen. Liz Brown in the key sponsorship role. The governor’s inflation relief bill will start in the House. At an event in Columbus on Thursday, Holcomb said there were no "red lines" to cross on the coming abortion restrictions.
  • Congress: The Jan. 6 ‘Moonstruck’ moment as scandal continues to mushroom
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS — Call it the nation’s “Moonstruck” moment, which occurred Tuesday during the House Jan. 6 Select Committee session. Only it wasn’t Cher urging Nicholas Cage to “snap out of it.” This was an obscure aide named Cassidy Hutchinson and White House Chief of Mark Meadows. With an armed mob goaded by President Trump marching toward the U.S. Capitol as Vice President Mike Pence and Congress counted the 538 Electoral College votes, Hutchinson had been warned by White House Counsel Pat Cipollone, “Please make sure we don’t go up to the Capitol, Cassidy. We’re going to get charged with every crime imaginable if we let that happen.” Trump, Meadows and senior White House officials knew the mob was armed. “I recall Tony (Deputy Chief of Staff Ornato) and I having a conversation with Mark (Meadows) probably around 10 a.m., 10:15 a.m. where I remember Tony mentioning knives, guns in the form of pistols and rifles, bear spray, body armor, spears, and flagpoles. Spears were one item, flagpoles were one item,” Hutchinson testified. “But then Tony had related to me something to the effect of these effing people are fastening spears onto the ends of flagpoles.”
  • Horse Race: Dobbs decision hits 1st CD race
    By MARK SCHOEFF JR.

    WASHINGTON – At the congressional level, just hours after the Supreme Court handed down a decision that struck down abortion rights, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee tried to make it an issue in the competitive 1st CD race between Democratic U.S. Rep. Frank Mrvan and Republican challenger Jennifer-Ruth Green. “The stakes in this election could not be higher; Jennifer-Ruth Green has cheered as the Supreme Court rips away Hoosiers’ constitutional rights,” DCCC spokeswoman Elena Kuhn said in a statement. “She couldn’t be more out of step with Indiana voters – and we will remind Hoosiers of her extreme support for taking away women’s freedoms to make their own health care decisions every day until November.”
  • Atomic: Abortion debate injected into 1st CD; How far will INGOP go? Jacob calls for total ban; Sen. Walker might go there; 20 women assaulted in Clark County Jail
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in West Lafayette
    and MARK SCHOEFF JR.in Washington

    1. Battle lines form over Roe, Dobbs: Just hours after the Supreme Court handed down a decision that struck down abortion rights, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee tried to make it an issue in the competitive 1st CD race between Democratic U.S. Rep. Frank Mrvan and Republican challenger Jennifer-Ruth Green. “The stakes in this election could not be higher: Jennifer-Ruth Green has cheered as the Supreme Court rips away Hoosiers’ constitutional rights,” DCCC spokeswoman Elena Kuhn said in a statement. “She couldn’t be more out of step with Indiana voters – and we will remind Hoosiers of her extreme support for taking away women’s freedoms to make their own health care decisions every day until November.” 

  • HPI Analysis: As Pence achieves his holy grail, he is stalled in GOP purgatory

    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - June 24, 2022 should be the political holy grail for Mike Pence. It was the day he had long strived for, the day Roe v. Wade was consigned to the “ash heap of history.” 
    "By returning the question of abortion to the states and to the people, this Supreme Court has righted an historic wrong and reaffirmed the right of the American people to govern themselves at the state level in a manner consistent with their values and aspirations," Pence said on Friday. "Now that Roe v. Wade has been consigned to the ash heap of history, a new arena in the cause of life has emerged and it is incumbent on all who cherish the sanctity of life to resolve that we take the defense of the unborn and the support for women in crisis pregnancy centers to every state in America." Pence's campaign PAC Advancing American Freedom quickly released a video saying that for pro-life Americans "today is one many thought they would never see" while adding, "His cause is our cause." It pointed out he was the first Republican in Congress to propose "defunding Planned Parenthood," he cast a pivotal tie-breaking vote in the Senate, and as governor of Indiana, signed every pro-life bill he was presented.

  • Atomic: SCOTUS consigns Roe to 'ash heap'; Indiana reaction; DOJ officials finger Trump

    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. SCOTUS consigns Roe to 'ash heap': For the first time in history, the United States Supreme Court rolled back the constitutional right to an abortion. It comes just weeks before the Indiana General Assembly convenes in a special session set for July 6 to pass a $1 billion tax rebate, but will almost certainly entertain additional abortion restrictions. In the 6-3 decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the court ruled: "We hold that Roe and Casey must be overruled. The Constitution makes no reference to abortion, and no such right is implicitly protected by any constitutional provision, including the one on which the defenders of Roe and Casey now chiefly rely — the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Roe was egregiously wrong from the start. Its reasoning was exceptionally weak, and the decision has had damaging consequences. And far from bringing about a national settlement of the abortion issue, Roe and Casey have enflamed debate and deepened division. It is time to heed the Constitution and return the issue of abortion to the people’s elected representatives.” In a solo concurring opinion by Justice Clarence Thomas: "In the future, we should reconsider all of this Court's substantive due process precedents, including Griswald, Lawrence and Obergfell." Those are rulings that protect contraception, same-sex relationships and same-sex marriage. CNN: The bombshell decision is set to upend races across the country as governors, attorneys general and other state and local leaders gain new powers to decide when abortion will be permitted, if at all, and who should be prosecuted and potentially incarcerated when bans take effect. Indiana Public Media's  Brandon Smith: "The question now in Indiana is not whether state lawmakers will ban abortion. They will. Probably by the end of July. The only question is whether Republicans will allow any exceptions for rape, incest or the life of the pregnant person."

  • Sen. Young votes for gun reforms; Braun voted no; House passes 234-193

    Howey Politics Indiana

    INDIANAPOLIS - U.S. Sen. Todd Young voted for the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act on Thursday. It was passed by the House and signed into law by President Biden. Young explained, "I have always been a strong supporter and defender of the Second Amendment, and I am committed to protecting the constitutional rights of law-abiding Hoosiers. As I reviewed this proposal, I consulted with law enforcement officials, gun owners, Second Amendment experts, educators, and mental health professionals. After careful consideration, I support this targeted legislation because it takes prudent steps to address our mental health crisis and combat violent crime without compromising the Second Amendment rights of law-abiding Hoosiers."

  • Horse Race: Morales v. Wells: An opening for INDems? GOP stalwart is an election 'denier'
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS – Did Hoosier Republicans nominate an election denier to become the state’s top election official? When Howey Politics Indiana pressed Republican nominee Diego Morales about an Associated Press report in which he had referred to the 2020 presidential election as a “scam,” his campaign texted this: “I proudly voted for Trump twice, but Joe Biden was elected president in 2020 and legitimately occupies that office today. He is doing a horrible job. There were a number of irregularities in that election, including the secretary of state in Pennsylvania changing election rules only 30 days before election day. Those kinds of actions are unacceptable. I am running for secretary of state to ensure that Hoosiers can trust their vote will be counted.” But in a March 8 article appearing on the website “Hoosier State Today,” Morales writes: “The recent shameful book and press tour of former Attorney General Bill Barr gives the biased corporate media yet another opportunity to pretend that those of us who maintain deep skepticism regarding the accuracy of the 2020 presidential election suffer from some delusion. Far from it. We have valid reasons to doubt the official vote tallies in key states. In clear contrast to (Secretary of State Holli) Sullivan, let me make my own position on 2020 crystal clear: The 2020 election was flawed and the outcome is questionable.”

  • Horse Race: Definitions for the 2022 mid-term election
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS  — Democracy. Republic. Sedition. Treason. Secession. Obstruction. Inflation. Stagflation. Recession. These are the terms that are driving the mid-term sequence political divide. After Indiana Republicans struck the word “democracy” from their platform last weekend, replacing it with “republic,” I thought it would be altogether appropriate to review the definitions of these words in the context of today’s troubled waters. Democracy (noun): Definition of democracy 1a: government by the people, especially: rule of the majority. b: a government in which the supreme power is vested in the people and exercised by them directly or indirectly through a system of representation usually involving periodically-held free elections. 2: a Political unit that has a democratic government (Merriam-Webster). Republic (noun): Definition of republic (1): a government having a chief of state who is not a monarch and who in modern times is usually a president; (2): a political unit (such as a nation) having such a form of government; b (1): a government in which supreme power resides in a body of citizens entitled to vote and is exercised by elected officers and representatives responsible to them and governing according to law; (2): a political unit (such as a nation) having such a form of government; c: a usually specified republican government of a political unit; the French Fourth Republic. 2: a body of persons freely engaged in a specified activity the republic of letters (Merriam-Webster).
  • GOP 'establishment' drubbed as Morales, Elliott win; 'democracy' scrubbed from platform
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Diego Morales won a second ballot GOP nomination for secretary of state Saturday afternoon, defeating incumbent Secretary Holli Sullivan 847 to 561, while Morgan County Republican Chairman Daniel Elliott won the treasurer's nod by three votes in a brutal day for so-called "establishment Republicans." The party platform also was changed with the term "democracy" subbed with the word "republic" throughout. Morales will face Democrat Destiny Scott Wells in November. Asked what his victory over Sullivan means, Morales answered, "I will say one word: Praise the Lord."

  • Atomic: Pence Capitol bookends 2001-21;  Judge Luttig's warning for '24; Trump's crack(pot) lawyers; Joe returns; Will Gov be at GOP convention?
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Pence bookends at the U.S. Capitol: On Jan. 6, 2001, freshman U.S. Rep. Mike Pence watched Vice President Al Gore preside over the ceremonial Electoral College count that sent George W. Bush and Dick Cheney to the White House. On Sept. 11, 2001, Rep. Pence ignored a Capitol Police order to evacuate the U.S. Capitol as Flight 93 barreled toward our citadel of democracy. On Thursday, the House Jan. 6 Select Committee heard harrowing evidence that the insurrectionist mob intending to partially decapitate the U.S. government - taking aim at Vice President Pence and Speaker Nancy Pelosi - came within 40 feet of the vice president while chanting "Hang Mike Pence!" We saw photos of the Pence family in the ceremonial Senate office, with Karen Pence rapidly closing curtains, the Pence brothers glancing at each other while the veep's daughter had a shocked expression on her face as the din of the mob arose about them. Pence lawyer Greg Jacob: "I could hear the din of the rioters in the building while we moved, but I don’t think I was aware that they were as close as that.” This became the Mike Pence bookends, confronting terrorists, both foreign and domestic. And there was President Trump goading the crowd on the Ellipse around noon on Jan. 6: “I hope Mike is going to do the right thing. I hope so. I hope so, because if Mike Pence does the right thing, we win the election.” And later, as the mob encroached into the Capitol: “Mike Pence didn’t have the courage to do what should have been done to protect our Country and our Constitution, giving States a chance to certify a corrected set of facts, not the fraudulent or inaccurate ones which they were asked to previously certify,” Trump tweeted at 2:24 p.m. “USA demands truth!” Greg Jacob: “There was no way that our framers, who abhorred concentrated power, who had broken away from the tyranny of George III, would ever have put one person, particularly not a person who had a direct interest in the outcome because they were on the ticket for the election, in a role to have a decisive impact on the outcome of the election." Jan. 6 committee Chairman Bennie Thompson: “We are fortunate for Mr. Pence’s courage on January 6. Thanks in part to Mike Pence, our democracy withstood Donald Trump’s scheme and the violence of January 6.”
  • Horse Race: Statewides historically have had little upward mobility
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS  – In the television age of Indiana politics, running for one of the statewide constitutional offices is a path for an aspiring bureaucrat and a middling salary. The Indiana auditor makes $66,000 annually. You’ll get a lot of free Lincoln (or Jefferson) day dinners, earning the polite applause of precinct folks and delegates. But if you aspire to Congress or see a future governor looking back at you from the mirror, running for secretary of state, treasurer, auditor or even attorney general isn’t a high-percentage way to go. Only three modern secretaries of state have advanced up the political food chain. Republican Edgar Whitcomb won the governorship in 1968, Democrat Evan Bayh did again 20 years later, and Republican Todd Rokita parlayed his two terms in the southeast Statehouse corner into a congressional seat in 2010, before becoming attorney general in 2020. In 2018, he lost a U.S. Senate Republican primary race to Mike Braun.

  • Horse Race: Washington hikes intensity of 1st CD race
    By MARK SCHOEFF, JR.

    WASHINGTON  — For the first time in nearly 100 years, there’s a chance a Republican could win the congressional seat in Northwest Indiana, and Washington is taking notice. This week, the campaign arms of House Democrats and Republicans waded into the 1st CD race between incumbent Democratic Rep. Frank Mrvan and Republican challenger Jennifer-Ruth Green. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee on Wednesday added Mrvan to its Frontline program, which is designed to bolster vulnerable candidates. The National Republican Congressional Campaign Committee also moved on Wednesday to boost Green by providing additional campaign support.
  • Atomic! Republicans douse Trump's 'big lie'; Young & Braun tip toe on gun reforms; INDem ticket revealed; Gov eyes special session; MD's future
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Republicans douse Trump's 'big lie': Monday was devastating for Donald Trump. Appearing before the U.S. House Jan. 6 Committee on Monday, were Republican allies and colleagues. Former Attorney General Bill Barr described an inflamed president touting misguided election conspiracy theories as "detached from reality. Jason Miller describes a drunk Rudy Giuliani who convinced Trump to declare victory on Election Night, while campaign manager Bill Stepien described the two campaign factions of "Team Normal" and "Team Rudy" as he tried to convince Trump that his chances for victory were "bleak." Instead, Trump ramped up the "stop the steal" rhetoric which ignited the Jan. 6 U.S Capitol insurrection while two-thirds of Republicans now believe what Barr called "bullshit." He also raised $250 million for the "Official Election Defense Fund," which doesn't exist. It is unknown what happened to that $250 million raised mostly from small donors ($60,000 went to Kimberly Guilfoyle for a two minute speech at the Ellipse on Jan. 6). Bill Barr: “There was never an indication of interest in what the actual facts were. My opinion then and my opinion now is that the election was not stolen by fraud. And I haven’t seen anything since the election that changes my mind on that. I thought boy, if he really believes this stuff, he has become detached from reality.” Republican election expert Ben Gingsberg: “In each one of those instances there was no credible evidence of fraud produced by the Trump campaign or his supporters. In all the cases that were brought — 60 cases, with more than 180 counts —the simple fact is that the Trump campaign did not make its case. In each one of those instances there was no credible evidence of fraud produced by the Trump campaign or his supporters." Trump White House attorney Eric Hershmann: “What they were proposing, I thought, was nuts — in theory was also completely nuts, right? It was a combination of Italians, the Germans, different things that had been floating around as to who was involved ... Hugo Chavez, the Venezuelans ... just all over their radar.” On the Dominion voting machines, Hershmann added, “The Dominion stuff, I never saw any evidence whatsoever to sustain those allegations.” 

  • HPI Analysis: With President Daniels leaving Purdue, let the speculation begin!
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Purdue President Mitch Daniels is leaving his post on Jan. 1, 2023, to be replaced by Mung Chiang, the university announced Friday. What is almost certain to follow is speculation (and hope) among his many Hoosier supporters that he consider a gubernatorial or White House run in 2024.  Informed and reliable sources tell Howey Politics Indiana  that the discussion of the topic of a Daniels return to the Statehouse Second Floor office has occurred, at least among key allies. It's happened this way before, when Daniels flirted with a 2012 presidential run. Gov. Eric Holcomb is term-limited, creating an open seat in 2024.

  • Holcomb to call special session to approve $1 billion in tax rebates

    Howey Politics Indiana

    INDIANAPOLIS - Gov. Eric Holcomb announced Thursday he will summon the General Assembly into a special session late June to approve a $1 billion rebate designed for relief of high inflation. “Hoosiers have real needs right now during this period of high inflation, from the gas pump to buying groceries, and everyone should benefit from the state’s success," Holcomb said. "I’ve met with Speaker Huston and Senator Bray and have asked them to discuss getting a billion dollars back into Hoosier hands with their colleagues. I’ve committed to work with them to call a special session before the end of June to take action to align this second round of returns with our current ATR.”

  • Atomic! Trump on 'Hang Mike Pence'; Gen. Milley describes Pence, Trump on Jan. 6; Cheney warns GOP; Banks sees 'partisan agenda'
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Trump says 'Maybe Pence deserves it': At the critical moment with an angry insurrectionist mob descending on the U.S. Capitol, the chant went up, "Hang Mike Pence." Gallows had been erected in Capitol Hill. At this critical moment, President Trump decided to throw Vice President Pence to the lions for failing to do his bidding to thwart the 2020 election and the will of the people. Gleefully watching the mayhem from the dining room off the Oval Office, Trump was quoted as saying, “Maybe our supporters have the right idea.” Mike Pence, he added, “deserves it.” Peter Baker of the New York Times: In the entire 246-year history of the United States, there was surely never a more damning indictment presented against an American president than outlined on Thursday night in a cavernous congressional hearing room where the future of democracy felt on the line. Other presidents have been accused of wrongdoing, even high crimes and misdemeanors, but the case against Donald J. Trump mounted by the bipartisan House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol described not just a rogue president but a would-be autocrat willing to shred the Constitution to hang onto power at all costs. The "Pence deserves it" revelation was just one from the U.S. House Jan. 6 Committee hearing Thursday night. Chairman Bennie Thompson made it devastatingly clear at last night's House Jan. 6 Committee when he said, “It was domestic enemies of the Constitution who stormed the Capitol.” He quoted President Lincoln who was prepared to transfer power during the Civil War facing what he perceived as certain defeat in the 1864 election that he would later win. Lincoln had his cabinet sign a memo vowing to turn over power. “This morning, as for some days past, it seems exceedingly probable that this Administration will not be re-elected," Thompson quoted Lincoln. "Then it will be my duty to so cooperate with the president elect.”
  • HPI Analysis: The nexus of 1st and 2nd Amendment limits
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    WASHINGTON – It was May 25, the day after America’s latest elementary school killing field claimed the lives of 19 more children and two teachers. Zionsville Mayor Emily Styron told WISH-TV she “woke up that morning after the Uvalde shooting, just enraged, honestly, just pissed off.” What followed was a social media exchange between the first-term Democrat and 71-year-old Joel Bardach of Westfield on gun ownership rights on Robert Goodman’s Facebook page. Bardach said that mass shootings are a “mental illness problem,” adding that New York and Chicago gun laws “prove gun laws alone don’t work” and that there is “no easy answer from anyone.” “Hey Joel Bardach … [expletive] you,” Styron posted. “I am so sick and tired of the stupid, useless rhetoric by jackasses like you when it comes to gun regulation. [Expletive] sick and tired of mass murders of OUR [expletive] CHILDREN … it’s time for the majority who know that gun permits and banning automatic weapons is COMMON [expletive] SENSE. So yeah, [expletive] YOU.” It was the second such outburst by a Hoosier mayor this year, following West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis citing “unvaccinated assholes” in August 2021 as another COVID-19 spike filled Hoosier hospitals.
  • Atomic! Miah, 11, describes massacre; Dr. Guerrero on 'pulverized' kids; The Mike Pence Show tonight; Alarming drop in collegiate Hoosiers
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. The tragic Uvalde testimony: Miah Cerrillo, an 11-year-old fourth grader from Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Tex, told the House Oversight Committee on Wednesday: “He shot my teacher and told my teacher 'Good night' and shot her in the head and then he shot some of my classmates and the white board. I thought [the gunman] was going to come back to the room, so I grabbed the blood and I put it all over me.” Cerrillo said she “stayed quiet” and then she grabbed her teacher’s phone and called 911. “I told [the operator] that we need help and to send the police [to my] classroom." Dr. Roy Guerrero, Uvalde pediatrician: “I know I’ll never forget what I saw that day. I raced to the hospital to find parents outside yelling children’s names and desperation and sobbing, as they beg for any news related to their child. Those mothers’ cries, I will never get out of my head. Sweet Miah, I’ve known her my whole life. As a baby, she survived major liver surgeries against all odds, and once again, she’s here as a survivor, inspiring us with her story today and her bravery. What I did find was something no prayer will ever relieve. Two children whose bodies had been pulverized by bullets fired at them, decapitated, whose flesh had been ripped apart. The only clue about their identities was blood-spattered cartoon clothes still clinging to them, clinging for life and finding none. Innocent children all over the country today are dead because laws and policy allow people to buy weapons before they’re legally old enough to even buy a pack of beer. They’re dead because restrictions have been allowed to lapse. They’re dead because there are no rules about where guns are kept, because no one is paying attention to who’s buying them. The thing I can’t figure out is whether our politicians are failing us out of stubbornness, passivity or both. I chose to be a pediatrician. I chose to take care of children. Keeping them safe from preventable diseases, I can do. Keeping them safe from bacteria and brittle bones, I can do, but making sure our children are safe from guns — that’s the job of our politicians and leaders. In this case, you are the doctors, and our country is the patients. We are lying on the operating table riddled with bullets, like the children of Robb Elementary and so many other schools. We are bleeding out, and you are not there.”
  • Horse Race: Morales claims Holcomb 'abused his powers'
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    FANCY GAP, Va. – As Howey Politics Indiana forecast in our May 25 edition, the showdown for secretary of state has veered into a referendum on Gov. Eric Holcomb. In a Saturday campaign Facebook posting coming just hours after the Indiana Supreme Court unanimously ruled in Gov. Eric Holcomb ‘s favor regarding constitutional powers, Republican secretary of state candidate Diego Morales said, “As the Governor has abused his executive powers, now is the time to elect proven conservatives who will stand up under pressure. We can’t let Governor Holcomb hand pick a replacement for a statewide constitutional office. The current appointed Secretary of State is nothing more than a Holcomb acolyte. Delegates, you have a chance to choose a fighter as your next Indiana Secretary of State. Someone who will stand up to the establishment here in Indiana. At the June 18th Indiana Republican Convention, I ask for your support.” Morales is challenging incumbent Secretary of State Holli Sullivan, Knox County Clerk Dave Shelton and former Libertarian Paul Hager.
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  • Holcomb will sign 'any' abortion restriction; House GOP to caucus outside Statehouse
    “I don’t have any red lines right now. It’s of paramount importance to me … that we must recognize that this issue is one of the most divisive by definition — when you look at where people fall in the nation — and that will require a thoughtful and respectful airing of where we all come from.” - Gov. Eric Holcomb to the Capital Chronicle, saying he will sign any abortion restriction legislation when the General Assembly reconvenes in a special session on July 25. Informed and reliable sources tell Howey Politics Indiana that House Republicans will caucus outside the Statehouse at an undisclosed location on Tuesday July 5 to develop legislation.
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