An image
Login | Subscribe
Tuesday, January 19, 2021
An image
An image
Thursday, November 14, 2019 11:58 AM
By BRIAN A. HOWEY

INDIANAPOLIS  — South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg has joined former Vice President Joe Biden, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders at the top of the leaderboard in the third Monmouth University Poll of the 2020 Iowa Democratic caucuses. Buttigieg’s gains since the summer have been across the board, with increasing support coming from nearly every demographic group.  Regardless, less than one-third of likely caucusgoers say that they are firmly set on their choice of candidate and most would not be too disappointed if they had to switch their support.  
  • HPI Interview: Holcomb talks pandemic, potential violence, post-Trump GOP
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS  — Less than 24 hours after the Capitol Hill insurrection, Gov. Eric Holcomb continued with his delayed year-end media interviews. On this day, he fielded questions via Zoom from Howey Politics Indiana, Indiana Legislative Insight’s  Ed Feigenbaum, and the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette’s Nikki Kelly. It came just four days prior to Holcomb’s second inaugural. He was sworn in with an intimate ceremony at the Indiana State Museum, where he drew a historic comparison with his favorite president, Abraham Lincoln. “At this moment, our moment, even knowing full well the awful toll of COVID-19 and acknowledging that we are still in its deadly grip, it’s important to look to the future – a future for our state and our citizens that I believe is full of opportunity and promise,” Holcomb said. “We will remain laser-focused on managing our way through this pandemic and rolling out vaccines with all the energy and resources of our administration, and I will further update you on what we’re doing in my State of the State Address next week. But I am reminded that, in midst of the Civil War, the United States was also constructing the first transcontinental railroad. Even as the country was tearing itself apart, we were binding ourselves together in ways that would prove far more meaningful and durable.”
  • Atomic! Fortress DC; Statehouse braces; Pence escapes; Biden's relief plan; Maskless at legislature
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Capitols targeted; Pence flees: Fortress DC is locked down ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration next Wednesday, with more National Guard troops in the capital at anytime since the Civil War. IMPD says two planned demonstrations are on tap for the Indiana Statehouse between today and Biden's inauguration next Wednesday. Indiana State Police Supt. Doug Carter: “Many, many meetings have occurred with IMPD, with our intelligence folks and I think we’re well-positioned.”  Now we learn from the Washington Post that Vice President Mike Pence was removed from the U.S. Senate chambers on Jan. 6 about a minute before the mob chanting "Hang Mike Pence" showed up. We've all seen the video of the Capitol cop luring the mob away from the Senate chambers. At the same time, security was rushing Pence, wife and daughter to a "secure location." WaPo: If the pro-Trump mob had arrived seconds earlier, the attackers would have been in eyesight of the vice president as he was rushed across a reception hall into the office.
  • HPI Analysis: Trump's presidency collapses
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS – In six days, America’s experiment with Donald Trump’s reality show presidency comes to an end. It hasn’t been pretty, particularly since he lost his reelection bid by seven million votes and a 306-232 Electoral College margin. There have been 376,000 COVID-19 deaths at a rate surpassing 4,000 a day. The 20 million vaccines that were supposed to end up in American arms by the end of 2020 didn’t make it past nine million. There were 141,000 jobs lost in December. There was a terror bombing in downtown Nashville that Trump ignored. And then came Jan. 6, when a “Stop the Steal” rally commenced at the Ellipse with the White House as a backdrop, centered around “the big lie,” which in Trump’s spin was actually his “landslide” victory stolen in a “rigged” election. In a Hollywood-esque scene that would have made “Network’s” tormented anchor Howard Beal proud, Trump ignited the fuses of thousands of MAGA supporters, sending them “mad as hell” to the U.S. Capitol, where an “insurrection” (in the words of U.S. Sen. Mitt Romney and President George W. Bush) aimed at preventing certification of Trump’s Electoral College loss. It cost six lives, including Capitol policeman Brian Sicknick, who was bludgeoned to death, and resulted in Trump’s second impeachment in the House. In American “days that will live in infamy,” we now have “1/6” joining “9/11” and Dec. 7, 1941. For the first time since Puerto Rican terrorists shot up the House in 1954, the U.S. Capitol had been breached. Before that, it was the British invasion in 1814.
  • Atomic! Impeachment redux; Bucshon, Banks nay, Mrvan yea; Pence nixes 25th; Carson targeted

    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Impeachment redux: 
    For the second time, impeachment proceedings have begun in the U.S. House against President Trump, a week before he is scheduled to leave office. But this time is different. Democrats say Trump led an “insurrection” against the United States after Trump goaded a MAGA rally to overwhelm the U.S. Capitol, killing at least five people.U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney announced she would vote for impeachment, saying,  “The President of the United States summoned this mob, assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack. Everything that followed was his doing. None of this would have happened without the President. The President could have immediately and forcefully intervened to stop the violence. He did not. There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.” Three other House Republicans have said they will follow Cheney. And Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell believes Trump has committed an “impeachable offense,” telling the New York Times there’s a 50/50 chance he would vote to convict. This comes as Vice President Pence, despite his “ruptured” relationship with Trump and reportedly tiring of his boss’s “bullshit,” declined to invoke the 25th Amendment on Tuesday. “I do not believe that such a course of action is in the best interest of our Nation or consistent with our Constitution,” Pence wrote in a letter to Speaker Nancy Pelosi.  

  • Atomic! Pence hanging around; Trump says speech 'Totally appropriate'; Holcomb on the 'big lie'
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Trump and Pence finally meet: While Vice President Pence was hiding in a "secure location" from a violent mob of Trump supporters in the U.S. Capitol, President Trump tweeted at 2:24 p.m. on Jan. 6, “Mike Pence didn’t have the courage to do what should have been done to protect our Country and our Constitution, giving States a chance to certify a corrected set of facts, not the fraudulent or inaccurate ones which they were asked to previously certify. USA demands the truth!” Trump didn't contact Pence when the insurrection ended, according to the Washington Post. The ultimate White House odd couple finally met in the Oval Office on Monday and had a “had a good conversation, discussing the week ahead and reflecting on the last four years of the administration’s work and accomplishments.” The meeting came as Pence resisted an ultimatum from House Democrats to invoke the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office. The Post story portrays Pence as "hanging around" the Oval Office as Trump called allies to convince the veep to help him overturn the election they lost by seven million popular votes and by a 306-232 Electoral College margin.
  • Atomic! Pressure on Pence; Veep, speaker targeted by mob; Holcomb cites Lincoln at 2nd inaugural
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Pressure on Pence to invoke 25th: NBC News  is reporting that House Democrats have given Vice President Mike Pence an ultimatum: Invoke the 25th Amendment to get President Trump out of office ASAP, or they will trigger a second impeachment, beginning Tuesday. NBC is reporting that Pence is not inclined to opt for the 25th, an amendment written by the late U.S. Sen. Birch Bayh. It calls for the vice president to initiate the process to temporarily remove a president incapable to fulfilling his functions, and it would take a majority of the cabinet to go into effect. "We are calling on the Vice President to respond within 24 hours," House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in her letter to Pence. In a brief session Monday, House Republicans blocked a measure calling on Vice President Pence and the Cabinet to remove Trump under the 25th Amendment, a move that ensures a vote in the full House, the Washington Post  reported. This comes as an angered and disheartened Pence has not talked with the president he has loyally served for four years since the incident, according to multiple national media reports. In one of the greatest ironies in modern times, both Pence and Pelosi were targeted by the insurrection mob that overwhelmed the U.S. Capitol on Jn. 6.

  • Atomic! Young, Trump & truth; Bracing for final 12 days; Pence to attend Biden inaugural; Hoosiers & violence

    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Young, Trump & truth: U.S. Sen. Todd Young, a former Marine intelligence officer, called Wednesday's insurrection at the U.S. Capitol the result of “a failure for many of our leaders to be truthful to the American people about what precisely has happened in our elections in recent months.” Asked by the IndyStar  if President Trump played a role in encouraging the violence that killed a Capitol policeman and a California woman, responded, “Of course. He’s president of the United States.”  Added Hoosier Republican U.S. Rep. Larry Bucshon, "I cannot condone this dangerous rhetoric by the president. Yesterday, the United States changed. The U.S. Capitol was breached for the first time since 1814 when the British took over and burned the Capitol during the War of 1812. Words have meaning and many of the President’s supporters took him literally, resulting in the attempted insurrection." hat Donald Trump's presidency is ending in chaos and insurrection; that he threw Vice President Mike Pence under the proverbial bus when the Hoosier wouldn't go along with this coup d'etat was entirely predictable.

  • HPI Analysis: Banana States of America
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS – When newly-elected Mike Pence showed up at the U.S. Capitol for his first joint session of Congress on Jan. 6, 2001, he watched Vice President Al Gore declare George W. Bush and Dick Cheney as the winning Electoral College ticket. He heard Gore, who lost a bitter election that was ultimately decided in the Bush v. Gore U.S. Supreme Court case, tell the assembly at its conclusion, “May God bless our new president and new vice president, and may God bless the United States of America.” Nine months and five days later – on Sept. 11 – Rep. Pence stood in that Capitol as the doomed Flight 93 approached, only to be forced in the ground hundred miles short of its mission of terror by patriot passengers. On Wednesday, Vice President Pence presided over a joint session of Congress in what should have been a routine congressional imprimatur of state certification showing he and President Donald Trump had lost the Nov. 3 election to Democrats Joe Biden and Kamala Harris. This occurred as CBS News reported this cryptic message heard on restricted channels by multiple New York air traffic controllers: “We are flying a plane into the Capitol Wednesday. Soleimani will be avenged.”

  • Atomic! Pence's crossroads; Banks, Walorski join EC protest; March Madness comes back home
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Pence at his crossroads: When Mike and Karen Pence decided to rekindle his political career after watching two redtail hawks drafting above their mountain horseback ride in 1999, they could hardly have conceived that his political legacy might come down to the counting of presidential Electoral College ballots. But at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Vice President Pence will preside over a joint session of Congress to do just that, or, perhaps, watch incalculable damage to the fragile American democracy experience as President Trump attempts to overturn an election. If Pence stays true to his oath to uphold the Constitution from enemies "both foreign and domestic," and declare Joe Biden the winner of the 2020 Electoral College he stands to anger Trump and his 80 million Twitter followers. If caves to Trump, he will forever be identified as the vice president who thwarted the will of 81 million Biden voters. At a campaign rally in Georgia Monday night, President Trump said, "I hope Mike Pence comes through for us, I have to tell you. Of course, if he doesn’t come through, I won’t like him quite as much.” Trump added that Pence is “going to have a lot to say about it. And you know one thing with him, you’re going to get straight shots. He’s going to call it straight.” 

  • Atomic! Time for a futile, stupid gesture; Trump's phone call; Reps. Mrvan, Spartz
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis 

    1. A really futile & stupid gesture: There's that Student Senate scene from the movie "Animal House"  when the Delta boys know the gig is up and Eric "Otter" Stratton says, "I think that this situation absolutely requires a really futile and stupid gesture be done on somebody’s part.” In the alternative reality of President Donald Trump, who lost the Nov. 3 election by seven million popular votes and a 306-232 margin in the Electoral College, this RF&SG takes place mid-day Wednesday when Vice President Pence presides over a joint session of Congress in what had been a ceremonial counting of the state certified Electoral College ballots. U.S. Sen. Mike Braun is joining 11 Senate Republican colleagues preparing to reject the will of the people, saying in a Saturday statement, "Congress should immediately appoint an Electoral Commission, with full investigatory and fact-finding authority, to conduct an emergency 10-day audit of the election returns in the disputed states. Once completed, individual states would evaluate the Commission’s findings and could convene a special legislative session to certify a change in their vote, if needed. Accordingly, we intend to vote on January 6 to reject the electors from disputed states as not ‘regularly given’ and ‘lawfully certified’ (the statutory requisite), unless and until that emergency 10-day audit is completed." Vice President Pence swatted away a lawsuit by Rep. Louie Gohmert, and then gave his tacit imprimatur to this effort, with Chief of Staff Marc Short saying, said in a statement, "The vice president welcomes the efforts of members of the House and Senate to use the authority they have under the law to raise objections and bring forward evidence before the Congress and the American people on January 6th."
  • Atomic! COVID exceptionalism; Will Pence follow Trump, or Quayle? Trump's 'insanity' assailed by NY Post
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. COVID exceptionalism: On Sept. 11, 2001, terror pilots plunged airliners into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, while the Flight 93 Americans forced their fates into the Pennsylvania loam several hundred miles away from its intended target, the U.S. Capitol. There were 2,977 Americans who died that day, compared to that other day of infamy, when 2,379 died at Pearl Harbor in 1941. These 7/11 attacks roused a sleepy nation into historic union, establishing the Arsenal of Democracy during World War II and a united front in 2001. In December 2020, the average American lives lost to COVID-19 arrived at 2,379 a day. And between March 11, when one Hoosier had been infected with COVID, and Dec. 11 when there were 7,432 infections, the notion of unity and American exceptionalism has been deeply impact, if not lost altogether. Indiana recorded a record 164 COVID deaths on Monday. Mortality is the lagging indicator of this cruel virus that leaves some of us asymptomatic and others in a death knell. On the 11th day of each pandemic month, Indiana moved toward its current predicament as the number of infections increased: 1 in March, 486 in April, 505 in May, 414 in June, 545 in July, 697 in August, 1,029 on Sept. 11, 1,554 in October, 5,613 in November, and 7,432 in December. According to the University of Washington's Health & Evaluation Metrics site, the 7,703 Indiana deaths recorded as of Dec. 29 are projected to be at 11,959 by April 1, 2021. 

  • Atomic! Trump's big 'nevermind'; Spartz joins GOP's 'squad'; Dr. Bucshon gets vaccinated
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Nevermind: Nevermind. Not only is President Trump the biggest loser of 2020, he exits the White House as the nation's most conspicuous bluffer and joker. In a spiteful stunt aimed at congressional Republicans, Trump feigned concern over the paltry $600 relief checks for most Americans (he said he wanted $1,200), implied he might veto the $2.4 trillion COVID relief package (including the omnibus spending bills that would keep the federal government open through next September), leaving millions of Americans unsure whether their unemployment would run out on Saturday, or how they would deal with the loss of a federal moratorium on eviction. "I will sign the omnibus and Covid package with a strong message that makes clear to Congress that wasteful items need to be removed," Trump finally said Sunday night, some four days after he left the White House for Mar-A-Lago. "I will send back to Congress a redlined version, item by item, accompanied by the formal rescission request to Congress insisting that those funds be removed from the bill."

  • Atomic! Trump chaos; Vetoes NDAA; Generals who weren't traitors; 50% see 'failed' president
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Trump bolts DC leaving wake of chaos: Merry Christmas Eve. Donald Trump, the chaos president, is in warm Mar-A-Lago. But his reality show presidency has left a wake of bedlam in Washington, within the Republican Party, and in a nation absorbing body blows such as 3,000 COVID deaths daily while 25% of households are food insecure. On Tuesday, Trump called the $900 billion COVID relief bill a "disgrace," wouldn't say whether he would sign it, veto or set it up for a pocket veto, which would essentially kick this mess to the next Congress on Jan. 3. He then embarked to his Florida estate, with no one sure of what will come next. Nor do the millions of Americans whose jobless benefits run out on Dec. 26. It also left open a fourth government shutdown during Trumps' presidency, this one coming during a deadly pandemic that is swamping hospitals across the nation.
  • Atomic! Trump upends GOP on relief package; Young, Rep. Pence defend; INCOVID updates; A plea from DuBois County
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Trump vomits in the punch bowl: President Trump vomited in the congressional punch bowel last night. He called the $900 billion COVID relief/omnibus spending bill a "disgrace" in a video released by the White House. “It’s called the COVID relief bill, but it has almost nothing to do with COVID,” Trump said. “Congress found plenty of money for foreign countries, lobbyists and special interests while sending the bare minimum to the American people. I am asking Congress to amend this bill and increase the ridiculously low $600 to $2,000.” Speaker Nancy Pelosi was delighted, saying, "Let's do it!" adding, “Republicans repeatedly refused to say what amount the President wanted for direct checks." It was U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis, who blocked a $1,200 check. But the president is confused here. Politico Playbook's  Jake Sherman explained, "He is saying that the COVID bill includes all sorts of non-COVID related policies. But many of the policies he's reading off are in the omnibus. The two were combined with his administration's blessing for ease of passage." Trump is also expected to veto the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) today, sources tell Fox NewsCNN's  Chris Cillizza: "If you're surprised by what Donald Trump is doing on his way out of office, you haven't been paying attention for the last 4 years."

  • Atomic! Congress passes COVID relief; Whole world watching Pence; Rev. Pat says Trump gig up; Mitch on Tanden
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Congress overwhelmingly passes COVID relief: Congress passed by a 91-7 vote in the Senate and 359-53 in the House a sprawling $2.3 trillion package that includes $900 billion in COVID relief while keeping the federal government open through September 2021. U.S. Reps. Jim Banks and Trey Hollingsworth were the only two Indiana delegation members to vote against the package that had been advocated for by Gov. Eric Holcomb and is expected to be signed by President TrumpWall Street Journal: The 5,593-page package approves another round of direct checks of $600 per adult and $600 per child, adds $300 to weekly unemployment payments for 11 weeks and extends two other unemployment programs, supplies more than $300 billion in relief for small businesses, including a second round of the Paycheck Protection Program, and pours more than $50 billion into distributing coronavirus vaccines, as well as testing and tracing efforts. Rep. Hollingsworth: "Today's $2.3 trillion funding bill - introduced after three previous stop-gap funding bills in 10 days and brought to the floor after giving representatives only six hours to read almost 6,000 pages - is another example of Washington's willingness to spend our money without considering our priorities. Hard-working Americans who are struggling deserve thoughtful solutions, not last-minute packages that inflate our nation's growing $27 trillion debt. We must always be thoughtful stewards of taxpayers' money, especially in the middle of a pandemic where thousands of Americans are out of work."
  • Atomic! Barr sees 'no basis'; Congress poised to pass COVID relief; Hoosiers on Sunday talk; Pence, Biden, Azar vaccines
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis

    1. Barr sees 'no basis' to seize vote machines: Outgoing Attorney General William Barr just had his last press conference, in which he said there is “no basis” for the federal government to seize battleground state voting machines. He also said he had “no intention” of appointing a special counsel to investigate Hunter Biden. This comes after weekend reporting by Axios  and theNew York Times revealing a scenario where the disgraced and pardoned Michael Flynn was urging President Trump to declare martial law, and also considering appointing attorney Sidney Powell as a special counsel. Axios: "A senior administration official said that when Trump is "retweeting threats of putting politicians in jail, and spends his time talking to conspiracy nuts who openly say declaring martial law is no big deal, it’s impossible not to start getting anxious about how this ends."
  • HPI Analysis: President Trump found power from grassroots Hoosier appeal
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS – As the era of President Trump draws to a close, the question is whether this will be a temporary reprieve, or a reality show to be continued over the next four years, leading to a compelling comeback in 2024. From the time he began appearing in Indiana in March 2016, to the uncertain nature of his exit a month from now, we’ve not witnessed a political figure who has had this kind of sway with Hoosiers. There was the meteor of Robert F. Kennedy in 1968, who drew huge crowds leading up to his Democratic primary win, with his life snuffed out less than two months later by an assassin. There was Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign that drew crowds of up to 25,000 over a six-week period, followed by a general election repeat in which he became the first Democrat to win the state’s 11 Electoral College votes since 1964. Before Kennedy and Obama, the only political figure who could move the Hoosier masses the way Donald Trump did over the past four years was D.C. Stephenson, the Ku Klux Klan Grand Dragon, who orchestrated a pervasive power grab in 1924 (backing Gov. Ed Jackson, winning the General Assembly and dozens of city halls) before a murder indictment and conviction ended that chapter. Trump packed Indiana’s basketball fieldhouses like no other from 2016 to 2018, leaving in his wake the cream of the Democratic crop (Evan Bayh, Joe Donnelly, John Gregg, Christina Hale) stunned, defeated and idled.

  • HPI Interview: Hupfer takes INGOP to historic new highs

    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS  — Earlier this year, Indiana Republican Chairman Kyle Hupfer pondered how much more dominant the state party could be. Now, in the wake of November’s elections, he discovered that answer.  Hoosier Republicans now control 88% of all county elected offices, or 1,330 out of 1,509. This comes on top of holding all of the Statehouse constitutional offices, nine out of 11 congressional offices, 71 mayoral offices after a 19-office increase in 2019, while it has maintained super majorities in the Indiana House (71 out of 100) and Senate (40 out of 50). In a memo to party stakeholders, Hupfer’s partnership with Gov. Eric Holcomb has led to four of the strongest years in party history, with $25 million raised.

  • Holcomb 2021 agenda to focus on pandemic, finances
    Howey Politics Indiana

    INDIANAPOLIS — Gov. Eric J. Holcomb today announced his 2021 Next Level Agenda, which is focused on safely navigating out of the pandemic and emerging as a stronger Indiana. “The 2021 Next Level Agenda is focused on making sure Indiana remains a state of opportunity for all,” Holcomb said. “To do that, we must manage our way through the world’s worst pandemic in over a century.” The 2021 Next Level Agenda includes five pillars detailing both legislative and administrative priorities for the year ahead: Cultivate a strong and diverse economy: To continue our dedication to fiscal responsibility, Gov. Holcomb’s 2021 agenda calls for passing the state’s ninth straight balanced budget. As the number one manufacturing state in the nation per capita, the Governor will seek to enhance our status by expanding our Manufacturing Readiness Grants to enable companies to modernize their operations. The state will also stay on track to triple federal defense investment in Indiana by 2025.
  • Atomic! Biden scolds Texas lawsuit signers; Braun acknowledges; Gov receives teacher pay report; Jury trials suspended
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY, in Indianapolis
    and MARK SCHOEFF JR. in Washington

    1. Biden unloads Texas amicus signers: The United States crossed what used to be a symbolic threshold on Monday as President-elect Joe Biden collected 306 Electoral College votes, to President Trump’s232, including 11 from Indiana. The difference in 2020 was Trump’s intent to in his tweeted words “overturn” the will of the people. A CBS Poll on Monday revealed 82% of Republicans don’t see his election as “legitimate.” In 2016, Trump declared his 306 EC votes as a “landslide.” Biden addressed the nation Monday night: “President Trump was denied no course of action he wanted to take. He took his case to Republican governors and Republican secretaries of state . . . to Republican state legislatures, to Republican-appointed judges at every level. Even President Trump’s own cybersecurity chief overseeing our elections said it was the most secure election in American history. They knew this election was overseen, overseen by them — it was honest, it was free, and it was fair. They saw it with their own eyes, and they wouldn’t be bullied into saying anything different. It was truly remarkable. By his own standards, these numbers represent a clear victory then, and I respectfully suggest they do so now.”

Looking for something older? Try our archive search
An image
  • Orwell on truth & consequences
    “The point is that we are all capable of believing things which we know to be untrue, and then, when we are finally proved wrong, impudently twisting the facts so as to show that we were right. Intellectually, it is possible to carry on this process for an indefinite time: the only check on it is that sooner or later a false belief bumps up against solid reality, usually on a battlefield.” George Orwell, author of "1984" writing in 1946.
     
An image
  • HPI Power 50: Crisis shapes 2021 list

    By BRIAN A. HOWEY
    and MARK SCHOEFF JR.

    INDIANAPOLIS – After two decades of publishing Power 50 lists in the first week of January, this one comes in a true crisis atmosphere. As we watched in horror the U.S. Capitol being overrun by supporters of President Trump on Wednesday, the COVID-19 pandemic has killed more than 8,000 Hoosiers and 350,000 Americans, shutting down our state and nation for nearly two months last spring. While vaccines are coming, there will be a distinct BC (Before COVID) and AC delineations as this epic story comes to a close. It gripped like a vise key figures, from Gov. Eric Holcomb to Vice President Pence. It delayed an election, closed schools and restaurants, reordered the way we do business and buy things, and will set in motion ramifications that we can’t truly understand (like the virus itself) at this point in time. There’s another crisis at hand. It’s our society’s civics deficit, fueled by apathy that transcends our schools and societal engagement, and allowed to fester by a news media in atrophy. That three members of the Indiana congressional delegation – U.S. Sen. Mike Braun and Reps. Jim Banks and Jackie Walorski – signed on to a protest this week, induced by losing President Donald Trump to “investigate” widespread vote fraud that doesn’t exist, is another indicator of the risks a polarized and undisciplined political spectrum brings to the fragile American democratic experience.

An image
HPI Video Feed
An image
An image




The HPI Breaking News App
is now available for iOS & Android!










An image
Home | Login | Subscribe | About | Contact
© 2021 Howey Politics, All Rights Reserved • Software © 1998 - 2021 1up!