TRUMP INSULTS YOVANOVITCH WHILE SHE TESTIFIES:
President Trump on Friday denigrated Marie L. Yovanovitch, the former United States ambassador to Ukraine, even as she testified in the impeachment inquiry about how she felt threatened by Mr. Trump, leading Democrats to accuse him of trying to intimidate a witness in real time (New York Times). “Everywhere Marie Yovanovitch went turned bad. She started off in Somalia, how did that go?” Mr. Trump wrote, assailing her on Twitter to his 66 million followers and adding that “It is a U.S. President’s absolute right to appoint ambassadors.” The president’s insults came as Ms. Yovanovitch told the House Intelligence Committee in powerful and personal terms of the devastation and fear she felt earlier this year, as she was targeted first by Mr. Trump’s allies and later by the president himself during a phone call with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine. Democrats said Mr. Trump’s onslaught amounted to an attempt to threaten Ms. Yovanovitch, who is still a State Department employee, and other potential witnesses against cooperating with the inquiry, a tactic that they said could itself be impeachable. Removed from her post as  ambassador to Ukraine, Ms. Yovanovitch said she was bereft when she came under fire in the spring from Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, and his eldest son, but even more stunned in September when she learned that Mr. Trump himself had told another foreign leader that she was “bad news” in his now-famous July 25 phone call with Ukraine’s president, and said she would “go through some things.”

FOX NEWS ANALYSTS WALLACE, STARR REACT: Chris Wallace encapsulates what most people watching thought ... on FOX NEWS at 10:42 a.m.: "If you are not moved by the testimony of Marie Yovanovitch today, you don't have a pulse. ... The really dramatic moment is that this wasn't just testimony about the past. This played out in real time with the president attacking her and saying that every place where she served went bad, and she was asked by Adam Schiff, do you see that as an effort to intimidate you and other witnesses? And she said I feel that is quite intimidating. And that does raise the possibility of witness intimidation and witness tampering as a new charge here. So we'll, again, we have to wait and see what happens when the Republicans start to question her, but it seems to me that this has been very powerful testimony this morning on the part of Marie Yovanovitch."

KEN STARR REACTS; 'I must say that the president was not advised by counsel in deciding to do this tweet. Extraordinarily poor judgment. The president frequently says, 'I follow my instincts.' Sometimes we have to control our instincts. So obviously this was I think quite injurious. I don't think it rises to the level of intimidation of a witness, but I think that's the way it's going to be characterized."

COAST GUARD WARNED ABOUT MISSOURI DUCK BOAT: The federal agency investigating the sinking of a duck boat in Missouri last year that killed 17 people said the Coast Guard ignored warnings that it should adopt more stringent safety requirements for the amphibious craft  (New York Times). The agency, the National Transportation Safety Board, criticized the Coast Guard’s oversight of duck boat operations in a 14-page report   released Wednesday, saying it had warned of safety hazards for two decades before the Stretch Duck 7 capsized near Branson, Mo., in July 2018. Seventeen of the boat’s 31 passengers died after the amphibious landing craft, a World War II military relic that could operate on land and water, overturned in Table Rock Lake during a thunderstorm that produced winds of over 60 miles per hour. The accident was one of the deadliest involving the touring vessels in United States history. The N.T.S.B. said it had pushed for the Coast Guard to require duck boats to have more watertight spaces above the waterline, known as reserve buoyancy, and to remove obstructions such as overhead canopies that could hamper an evacuation.

COACH KNIGHT SHOWS UP AT BLUEBIRD: Chants of “Bobby” and “Thank you, coach” echoed throughout The Bluebird on Saturday as former Indiana basketball coach Bob Knight made a surprise appearance (IndyStar). "Hoosier Hysterics" — a podcast dedicated to Indiana men’s basketball — was hosting a live event when the former coach made an unexpected arrival to close out the afternoon. Knight took the stage to a loud roar and a plethora of cellphones recording the moment. It is rare for him to make public appearances in Bloomington, and on Indiana’s campus, as the emotions around his firing continue to linger nearly 20 years later. Knight made an appearance at an Indiana baseball game last spring, but there have not been many signs of him making a return to Assembly Hall. However, he showed some intention to return while at The Bluebird. “Let’s go tomorrow,” Knight said in response to a fan asking when he’ll be returning to the arena. There is no men’s basketball game scheduled for Sunday, but there is a women’s game slated. While he showed signs of being open to an Assembly Hall return, most of his time on stage was a showcase of personality. Knight did not refrain from cursing and made jokes about former players that were in attendance not knowing how to play defense. “You’ve gotta excuse my language right now,” Knight said. “Because when I was coaching that’s all I talked about.” With numerous former players in attendance, Knight showed gratitude toward them and toward the fans for how he was treated during his 29 seasons as Hoosiers coach. “I think they knew that the fans here really wanted to see good basketball, and they gave it to them,” he said while choking up. 

GIBSON COUNTY MINE LAYS OFF 180:
More than 180 employees of a Gibson County mine were told Friday that they will be laid off in January, according to a WARN notice filed Friday (Evansville CourIer & Press). Gibson County Coal will be reducing its production at the GCC Complex in Owensville and Princeton by 184 employees, according to the notice, which is required under the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act.  

AMISH ACRES CLOSING IN NAPPANEE:
Amish Acres, a popular tourist destination in northern Indiana, is closing after 50 years in business (WIBC). Jeff Kitson, executive director of the Nappanee Area Chamber of Commerce, said he received a letter from Amish Acres founder and CEO  Richard Pletcher on Friday, saying his family is retiring at the end of 2019 and will close Amish Acres after its New Year’s fireworks show. Kitson says the business will likely go to auction in early spring if the family hasn’t found a buyer by then. The Nappanee site includes a bakery, meat and cheese shop, arts and crafts boutiques, a theater for stage plays, an inn with 62 guest rooms and a restaurant featuring traditional Amish cooking. Kitson says more than 5 million people have visited.

HPI DAILY ANALYSIS:
it's good to see Coach Knight making his return to Bloomington. It's time for everyone to move on.  - Brian A. Howey  

Sunday Talk         

CONWAY BRISTLES AT QUESTION: Kellyanne Conway sat down for an interview with CNN on Thursday that turned contentious after host Wolf Blitzer asked the White House counselor about her husband, outspoken Trump critic George Conway. “I just have a final question, a sensitive question, and it’s a political question, it’s a substantive question,” Blitzer asked. “I don’t want to talk about your marriage. I know that there are issues there.” Conway immediately bristled at Blitzer’s suggestion about her marriage. “Did you just say there are issues there?” she exclaimed. “You don’t want to talk about—why would you say that?!” George Conway had just spent an entire day at MSNBC providing on-air analysis and criticizing the GOP’s “incoherent” defense of the President. 

Campaigns

COFFEY DISPUTES NEW ALBANY TOTALS: Mayor Jeff Gahan won a third term last week by 1,224 votes over his nearest opponent. But one candidate for the same office, independent Dan Coffey, said he believes some of the votes Gahan received were intended for him or Republican challenger Mark Seabrook (News&Tribune). Coffey said many voters had issues with the touch screen machines. He said as they touched the candidate's name for whom they wanted to vote, their vote jumped to another candidate. And if they didn't check over their final votes, they actually voted for the wrong person. Gahan, the Democrat, finished with 4,631 votes while Seabrook had 3,407 and Coffey came in third at 409. "I do not believe I would have won," Coffey told the Floyd County Election Board on Wednesday afternoon. "I have no doubt, though, by not looking into this that you are certifying an election where it's very questionable the one you say actually won, won."

Congress

BRAUN PRAISES TRUMP TRANSPARENCY: U.S. Senator Mike Braun applauds President Trump’s decision to force hospitals and insurance companies to disclose their secret negotiated rates and publicize their costs, putting the decision-making power into the hands of the American consumer. Braun recently penned an op-ed in The Hill praising President Trump for bringing transparency to the U.S. healthcare market and his decision for hos overnment-controlled entities. While I support the Export-Import Bank and want to vote to reauthorize it, I cannot support House Democrats’ partisan reauthorization.”

 Indiana’s students will be closed Tuesday while their teachers attend the rally. Holcomb didn’t criticize school districts for closing the day of the union-organized rally, saying it was a local decision. The Republican governor said Thursday he applauds teachers for expressing their concerns but he’s waiting for a teacher pay commission he appointed to make recommendations by the end of next year. The rally dubbed “Red for Ed Action Day es, but also lower energy costs for our rural agribusinesses.”
 The second month of legal sports betting in Indiana saw nearly three times as much money wagered than in its opening month, with much of that surge coming from bets placed using mobile devices instead of at casinos, state data shows (AP). Gamblers wagered a total of $91.7 million on sports in Indiana.

Nation

WHITE HOUSE: TRUMP LASHES OUT AT PENCE AIDE -
President Donald Trump lashed out on Sunday against Jennifer Williams, a foreign policy aide to Vice President Mike Pence who has become the latest impeachment inquiry witness to be targeted by the president’s ire (Yahoo News). “Tell Jennifer Williams, whoever that is, to read BOTH transcripts of the presidential calls, & see the just released statement (sic) from Ukraine,” he tweeted. “Then she should meet with the other Never Trumpers, who I don’t know & mostly never even heard of, & work out a better presidential attack!” On Saturday, House lawmakers released a transcript of Williams’ testimony on Trump’s July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, which is at the heart of impeachment proceedings. A rough transcript of the call shows Trump sought Zelensky’s help with a corruption probe of former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter, based on unsubstantiated allegations. Earlier this month, Williams told Intelligence Committee members that the conversation on which she listened in, “struck me as unusual and inappropriate." She described the discussion as “more political in nature” than Trump’s communications with other foreign leaders, noting that he was concerned with his “personal political agenda.”

CRIME: ROGER STONE FOUND GUILTY -
Roger Stone, the right-wing provocateur and longtime associate of President Trump, was convicted on Thursday in his trial over allegations of lying to Congress and witness tampering (The Hill). The verdict is another victory for former Special Counsel Robert Mueller, whose legal team alleged that Stone had tried to conceal from Congress his contacts with the Trump campaign and people he believed were feeding him inside information about WikiLeaks during the 2016 campaign.

WHITE HOUSE: CONWAY BRISTLES AT QUESTIONS ABOUT HUSBAND
- Kellyanne Conway sat down for an interview with CNN on Thursday that turned contentious after host Wolf Blitzer asked the White House counselor about her husband, outspoken Trump critic George Conway.  “I just have a final question, a sensitive question, and it’s a political question, it’s a substantive question,” Blitzer asked. “I don’t want to talk about your marriage. I know that there are issues there.” Conway immediately bristled at Blitzer’s suggestion about her marriage. “Did you just say there are issues there?” she exclaimed. “You don’t want to talk about—why would you say that?!” George Conway had just spent an entire day at MSNBC providing on-air analysis and criticizing the GOP’s “incoherent” defense of the President. Blitzer stated he merely wanted to get Conway’s reaction to her husband’s criticism. “So before you play the clip which I haven’t seen. Why—why are you doing that?” Conway asked, prompting Blitzer to note that her husband is a “legal scholar” who is renowned for his criticisms of the President.

Local


TERRE HAUTE: PD MAY MOVE TO TRIBUNE-STAR BUILDING -
Architects for the city are working on plans that could put the Terre Haute Police Department in the Tribune-Star building on South Seventh Street a move Mayor Duke Bennett says could save the city millions and put officers in a new home sooner (Terre Haute Tribune-Star). Bennett said RQAW, a Fishers-based architectural and engineering firm, is working on a preliminary plan to incorporate previous  plans into the Tribune-Star building’s layout. The city would look to use funds from its Central Business District (downtown) tax increment financing district to pay for the lease and build-out, around $7 to $8 million total. To use TIF monies, the city would have to seek the approval of the Terre Haute Redevelopment Commission. With design and a deal still pending, no timeline has been established for when that request might come. If approved by the Redevelopment Commission, a deal — if one is struck — would then go to the City Council. The city has been looking for a new home for its police department for years. The department’s move in 2004 into a former bank complex was never intended to be permanent. Parts of the facility are believed to be 100 years old.

EAST CHICAGO: FUNDING COMING FOR SUPERFUND SITE-
The Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority is giving workforce housing funding to build homes in a Superfund site in East Chicago. At least half of the homes will be sold to buyers making 50 percent or less than the area’s median income as determined by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The rest will go to families making 80 percent or less (Indiana Public Media). Four of the six homes will be built on 4900 block of Alexander Avenue and two others on the 4900 block of Melville Avenue. Earlier this year, the Environmental Protection Agency targeted nearly 200 properties in that area for cleanup due to abnormally high levels of arsenic and lead in the soil. Frank Rivera is the executive director for East Chicago’s Department of Redevelopment. He says the new homes will be a step towards revitalizing the area’s economy. “I think this is going to create more stable and affordable and good quality housing in order for us to create a more economically stable community,” he says. “And that’s the key: it’s quality of life.”

TRUMP INSULTS YOVANOVITCH WHILE SHE TESTIFIES: President Trump on Friday denigrated Marie L. Yovanovitch, the former United States ambassador to Ukraine, even as she testified in the impeachment inquiry about how she felt threatened by Mr. Trump, leading Democrats to accuse him of trying to intimidate a witness in real time (New York Times). “Everywhere Marie Yovanovitch went turned bad. She started off in Somalia, how did that go?” Mr. Trump wrote, assailing her on Twitter to his 66 million followers and adding that “It is a U.S. President’s absolute right to appoint ambassadors.” The president’s insults came as Ms. Yovanovitch told the House Intelligence Committee in powerful and personal terms of the devastation and fear she felt earlier this year, as she was targeted first by Mr. Trump’s allies and later by the president himself during a phone call with President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine. Democrats said Mr. Trump’s onslaught amounted to an attempt to threaten Ms. Yovanovitch, who is still a State Department employee, and other potential witnesses against cooperating with the inquiry, a tactic that they said could itself be impeachable. Removed from her post as ambassador to Ukraine, Ms. Yovanovitch said she was bereft when she came under fire in the spring from Rudolph W. Giuliani, the president’s personal lawyer, and his eldest son, but even more stunned in September when she learned that Mr. Trump himself had told another foreign leader that she was “bad news” in his now-famous July 25 phone call with Ukraine’s president, and said she would “go through some things.”

FOX NEWS ANALYSTS WALLACE, STARR REACT:
Chris Wallace encapsulates what most people watching thought ... on FOX NEWS at 10:42 a.m.: "If you are not moved by the testimony of Marie Yovanovitch today, you don't have a pulse. ... The really dramatic moment is that this wasn't just testimony about the past. This played out in real time with the president attacking her and saying that every place where she served went bad, and she was asked by Adam Schiff, do you see that as an effort to intimidate you and other witnesses? And she said I feel that is quite intimidating. And that does raise the possibility of witness intimidation and witness tampering as a new charge here. So we'll, again, we have to wait and see what happens when the Republicans start to question her, but it seems to me that this has been very powerful testimony this morning on the part of Marie Yovanovitch."

KEN STARR on Fox News:
"Well, I must say that the president was not advised by counsel in deciding to do this tweet. Extraordinarily poor judgment. The president frequently says, 'I follow my instincts.' Sometimes we have to control our instincts. So obviously this was I think quite injurious. I don't think it rises to the level of intimidation of a witness, but I think that's the way it's going to be characterized."

COAST GUARD WARNED ABOUT MISSOURI DUCK BOAT:
The federal agency investigating the sinking of a duck boat in Missouri last year that killed 17 people said the Coast Guard ignored warnings that it should adopt more stringent safety requirements for the amphibious craft (New York Times). The agency, the National Transportation Safety Board, criticized the Coast Guard’s oversight of duck boat operations in a 14-page report released Wednesday, saying it had warned of safety hazards for two decades before the Stretch Duck 7 capsized near Branson, Mo., in July 2018. Seventeen of the boat’s 31 passengers died after the amphibious landing craft, a World War II military relic that could operate on land and water, overturned in Table Rock Lake during a thunderstorm that produced winds of over 60 miles per hour. The accident was one of the deadliest involving the touring vessels in United States history. The N.T.S.B. said it had pushed for the Coast Guard to require duck boats to have more watertight spaces above the waterline, known as reserve buoyancy, and to remove obstructions such as overhead canopies that could hamper an evacuation.