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Monday, July 22, 2019
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  • Epstein, Acosta and the perversion of power
    For those of you wondering why Labor Secretary Alex Acosta resigned Friday despite President Trump's assertion that he is a "great labor secretary," spend 15 minutes to read Miami Herald reporter Julie K. Brown's "Perversion of Justice: How a future Trump Cabinet member gave a serial sex abuser the deal of a lifetime." You'll learn that District Attorney Acosta bowed to the demands of pedophile Jeffrey Epstein's all-star legal team, cut "an extraordinary plea agreement that would conceal the full extent of Epstein’s crimes and the number of people involved." This is about a lurid a tale of crime and power as I've ever read. While this was going on, Epstein's enforcers were tracking down witnesses and journalists, issuing threats.

    Brown writes: "Not only would Epstein serve just 13 months in the county jail, but the deal — called a non-prosecution agreement — essentially shut down an ongoing FBI probe into whether there were more victims and other powerful people who took part in Epstein’s sex crimes." We are learning that Epstein's circles included dozens if not hundreds of underage girls, recruiters, presidents, princes and the rich and famous.

    Florida State Sen. Lauren Book, asks: “Where is the righteous indignation for these women? Where are the protectors? Who is banging down the doors of the secretary of labor, or the judge or the sheriff’s office in Palm Beach County, demanding justice and demanding the right to be heard?"

    Of course President Trump said of Epstein in 2002, “I’ve known Jeff for fifteen years. Terrific guy. He’s a lot of fun to be with. It is even said that he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side." Wink-wink. That was three years before Trump's infamous Access Hollywood comment (if you're rich and famous, "you can grab them by their pussy") and five years before Acosta's plea deal with Epstein. It begs the question, What would Mother think?  - Brian A. Howey, publisher
  • President Washington's farewell warning to Americans
    “The disorders and miseries which result gradually incline the minds of men to seek security and repose in the absolute power of an individual; and sooner or later the chief of some prevailing faction, more able or more fortunate than his competitors, turns this disposition to the purposes of his own elevation, on the ruins of public liberty. It serves always to distract the public councils and enfeeble the public administration. It agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms, kindles the animosity of one part against another, foments occasionally riot and insurrection. It opens the door to foreign influence and corruption, which finds a facilitated access to the government itself through the channels of party passions. Thus the policy and the will of one country are subjected to the policy and will of another.” - President George Washington, in his farewell address in 1797.
  • Trump, Putin yuk it up over 2020 election assault threat
    National Intelligence Director Dan Coats, FBI Director Christopher Wray, and CIA Director Gina Haspel have all acknowledged that the Russians assaulted the U.S. election process in 2016 and warned that the Kremlin remains a threat for the 2020 U.S. elections. In June 2018, the Justice Department indicted 12 members of the Russian intelligence agency, GRU, as part of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation. The indictment accused the Russians of engaging in a "sustained effort" to hack emails and computer networks associated with the Democratic party during the 2016 presidential campaign. In his final report in April, Mueller warned, “I will close by reiterating the central allegation of our indictments — that there were multiple, systematic efforts to interfere in our election. That allegation deserves the attention of every American.”

    But the notion that President Trump and his administration takes this threat seriously completely dissolved on Friday when he met with Russian President Putin in Osaka during the G-20 summit. A reporter asked Trump if he would warn Putin not to meddle in America's upcoming 2020 election. “Of course,” the president replied. Then he turned to Putin and facetiously said, “Don't meddle in the election.” He playfully repeated the request while pointing to the smirking Putin, who laughed. This comes after Trump told ABC News he would be open to accepting information from foreign sources on political opponents.

    Trump glanced at reporters and told Putin: “Get rid of them, fake news. You don't have the problem in Russia. We have it; you don't have it.” Putin responded, “Yes, yes, we have it. The same.” The difference is that Putin murders investigative reporters in Russia.

    So this president, who took an oath "to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States," instead joined a Russian head of state to yuk it up over the threat. Pathetic. Disturbing. Dangerous. Historic.
    - Brian A. Howey, publisher
  • Trump '100% for Pence on 2020 ticket

    President Trump made it clear that he will seek reelection in 2020 with Vice President Mike Pence on the ticket. NBC Meet The Press  host Chuck Todd asked Trump if he would run with Pence. "Well, look, look - 100 percent, yes. He's been, he’s been a terrific vice president. He's my friend." 

    Todd asked Trump why he didn't commit to supporting Pence for president in 2024. "Because it was a surprise question," the president said. "I mean, you know, I’m not even thinking of it. It's so far out. I mean, It's so far out. That would be the only reason. Now what happens in 2024? I don't know that Mike is going to run. I don't know who's running or anything else." - Brian A. Howey, in Indianapolis

  • Visclosky outlines Defense expenditures after House passage
    “This bill makes several efforts to focus on the well-being and morale of those in uniform, their families, DoD civilians, and defense communities." - U.S. Rep. Pete Visclosky after the House approved H.R. 2740, legislation that included Visclosky’s Fiscal Year 2020 Defense Appropriation Act. It includes a 3.1% pay raise for military men and women, $70.7 million for military childcare facilities, $297.2 million for Sexual Assault Prevention and Response programs at the Service level, $1.26 billion for environmental restoration activities, $101.5 billion for basic and applied scientific research, development, and the testing of new technologies and equipment, and $1.3 billion for the National Guard.
  • Mayor Pete gets a great debate card
    Mayor Pete may have his dream debate matchup. He'll be matched up with former vice president Joe Biden, along with Sen. Bernie Sanders and Sen. Kamala Harris on Tuesday, June 27, the second night of the debates. Others on the Tuesday card include Sen. Michael Bennet, Rep. Eric Swalwell, Andrew Yang, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Gov. John Hickenlooper and Marianne Williamson.

    So Buttigieg gets to share a stage with the two frontrunners of Biden and Sanders. He's got to be pleased with that. - Brian A. Howey, in Iowa City
  • Claybourn's 'Our American Story' seeks elusive unity

    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    EVANSVILLE – Joshua Claybourn describes himself as a “relatively unknown lawyer from the Midwest.” But on June 1, his book “Our American Story: The Search for a Shared National Narrative” goes on sale, and the lineup of contributors is impressive. Included are historians, including Pulitzer Prize winners David W. Blight, Alan Taylor along with Gordon Wood; lawyers Cass Sustein, Richard E. Epstein, Ilya Somin and  Gerard N. Magliocca of the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law. Political scientists and analysts include Spencer Boyer, Eleanor Clift, Nikolas Gvosdev, Jason Kuznicki, Markos Moulitsas, James V. Wertsch and Ali Wyne. And there are the politicians, including U.S. Rep. Jim Banks and former Sen. John Danforth.

    Claybourn, an Evansville attorney and Howey Politics Indiana contributor, explains, “Over the past few decades, the complicated divides of geography, class, religion, and race created deep fractures in the United States, each side fighting to advance its own mythology and political interests. We lack a central story, a common ground we can celebrate and enrich with deeper meaning. Unable to agree on first principles, we cannot agree on what it means to be American. As we dismantle or disregard symbols and themes that previously united us, can we replace them with stories and rites that unite our tribes and maintain meaning in our American identity?”

    He explains in the book’s foreward: “We’ve seen these factional clusters deepen, harden, and separate, leading in turn to anger, misunderstanding, and hostility. Meanwhile, trust in institutions — government, business, the media, and higher education — continues to erode. Cultural warfare further splits our society, exposing fundamental differences about our views of justice and human nature. Unable to agree on first principles, we cannot agree on what it means to be American. As a result, we share few of the touchstones that, in the past, contributed to our national mythology."

    You can order “Our American Story” by clicking here. 

  • Indiana newspaper closings continue

    Indiana's atrophied newspaper saga continues. Today we learn of the closing of the Hendricks County Flyer, which covered Brownsburg, Avon, Plainfield and surrounding areas. Publisher Beverly Joyce told readers that only 6% of recipients voluntarily paid for the paper. “Unfortunately, the business model of free content to a large print audience was not sustainable,” the paper quoted Joyce saying. “We tried every way we could to keep the operation viable.”

    This sad news comes as close to 1,800 newspapers across the U.S. have closed since 2004. Other newspapers closing in Indiana include NUVO Newsweekly in Indianapolis and Green Banner Publishing of Pekin, which had newspapers in Scott, Washington and Floyd counties. The Fort Wayne News-Sentinel is now a one-person operation.

    This is a crisis for Hoosier citizens. Where will they be getting their local news? - Brian A. Howey, publisher


  • Services for Sen. Lugar May 14-15
    On behalf of the Lugar family, The Lugar Center issued the following statement regarding funeral and farewell arrangements for former United States Senator Richard Lugar: The Lugar family extends its heartfelt gratitude for the outpouring of condolences since the Senator’s unexpected death early Sunday.  The funeral service will occur on Wednesday May 15 at 1pm at St. Luke's United Methodist Church in Indianapolis. The Senator served as a lay elder at St Luke’s and his family were founding members. Additionally, the Senator will lie in state in the Rotunda of the State Capitol for 24 hours prior to the funeral.  In a brief ceremony at noon on Tuesday May 14, Gov. Holcomb will commence the memorial period, after which the Rotunda will be open for those who wish to pay respects at the catafalque.  The public will be welcome through sunset on Tuesday and from 8 a.m. through 11 a.m. on Wednesday.  The Lugar family will be available to greet well-wishers in the South Atrium of the Capitol from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday the 14th. The seating capacity of the church will not permit everyone who wishes to attend the funeral to be there in person.  As space permits, we will admit as many as possible.  More information on this process will be forthcoming. Additionally, so that all the Senator’s friends world-wide can view the funeral, the entire service will be streamed live on the internet.  More information on that will also be forthcoming. We have received inquiries regarding memorial contributions; the family has asked that these be directed to The Lugar Center in order to continue the Senator’s work on nonproliferation, global food security and bipartisan governance. Click here.
  • Buttigieg and Trump head to head
    The latest CNN/SSRS Poll reveals head-to-head matchups between President Trump and six of the Democratic contenders. Of this group, South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg fares toward the bottom of the pack, with a 47-44% lead over Trump. Only Sen. Elizabeth Warren was worse, with Trump leading her 48-47%. Beto O'Rourke does best with a 52-42% lead, followed by Joe Biden (51-45%) and Sen. Bernie Sanders (50-44%.)

    Trump's job approval varies depending on the poll. Rasmussen Reports has him 50/47% approve/disapprove; CNN has him 44/53%, Quinnipiac 41/55%, NPR/PBS/Marist 42/54% and The Hill/Harris X 46/54%. - Brian A. Howey, publisher
  • Tributes pour in for Sen. Lugar
    “The world weeps alongside Indiana after just learning we lost one of our best, ever. As an always faithful servant to the highest ideals in every walk of his incredible life, Richard Lugar ran the family farm, charted a new innovative course for Indiana’s capital city, and devoted a record six terms as a U.S. Senator to making the world a more prosperous and peaceful place. He was an officer and gentleman, father and faith leader, a Mayor and Senator, a diplomat and legendary role model to millions. Janet and I are keeping Mrs. Lugar and their wonderful family in our prayers and ask all those touched by his service to join us.” - Gov. Eric Holcomb, mourning the death of U.S. Sen. Richard Lugar. Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett said, "Indianapolis mourns the loss of a native Hoosier and American statesman who changed the face of our city and embodied the heart of our nation. Senator Lugar's career is rightfully characterized by his time in the United States Senate and his outstanding leadership on matters of foreign security and international diplomacy. But he began his public life as a member of the Indianapolis Board of School Commissioners, before becoming a visionary mayor who embraced the transformative potential of local government. He understood that progress could only occur when good ideas and good people came together -- from all sides of the political landscape. And he demonstrated a commitment to country over party, community over self, that is almost unparalleled in today's polarized world." U.S. Sen. Mike Braun said, “Sen. Richard Lugar is a towering figure in Hoosier history and one of the greatest statesmen ever to serve in the U.S. Senate.  As our longest serving Senator, he worked tirelessly with leaders across the globe to better the state and the country he loved.  Maureen and I are praying for the Lugar family in this difficult time.” Indiana Republican Party Chairman Kyle Hupfer added, "Today as Hoosiers and Americans, we mourn the loss of Richard Lugar, the ultimate statesman who leaves an immeasurable impact on the city of Indianapolis, the state of Indiana, our nation and our globe.
  • Poll has Trump leading Mayor Pete by 4%
    South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg has caught the attention of President Trump, who told Sean Hannity Thursday night on Fox News, “I’m rooting for him, but he is not going to make it.”

    On Friday, a Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds Trump with 44% support to Buttigieg’s 40% among likely voters. The sizable 16% of undecideds in this survey are likely a reflection of Buttigieg’s lack of name recognition at this early stage. Some 40% have a favorable opinion of the openly gay mayor, including 16% with a very favorable one, while 32% view him unfavorably, with 18% who hold a very unfavorable view. But 27% don’t know enough about Buttigieg to express even a soft opinion of him. 

    By comparison, in previous White House Watch surveys, only five percent (5%) had no opinion of former Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, 2020 presidential hopefuls who have been on the national political scene for years. Biden edges Trump in this early matchup. Sanders loses to the incumbent. A Morning Consult Poll this week had Biden leading Trump 42-34%.
    - Brian A. Howey, publisher
  • Sen. Birch Bayh memorial service set for May 1 at Statehouse
    A memorial service honoring the career of Indiana’s former United States Senator and House Speaker Birch Bayh (1928-2019) will be held Wednesday, May 1, 2019, at noon EDT in the south atrium of the Indiana Statehouse.  Among those remembering Sen. Bayh’s accomplishments will be Gov. Eric Holcomb, House Speaker Brian Bosma, Purdue President Mitch Daniels, former Congressmen Lee Hamilton and Baron Hill, and Federal District Court Chief Judge Jane E. Magnus-Stinson.

    Indiana’s former Secretary of State, Governor and United States Senator Evan Bayh and Indianapolis attorney Christopher Bayh will eulogize their father.  Former First Lady Susan Bayh will attend, as will their sons Beau (2LT, USMC) and Nick (2LT, USA).  Sen. Bayh’s widow, Katherine “Kitty” Bayh (née Halpin), will read a poem written by the Senator.

    The event is open to the public and no RSVPs are necessary.  Attendees should enter the Statehouse from either the upper east (Capitol Street) or lower west (Senate Avenue) entrances.  While the Indiana General Assembly is not scheduled to be in session, attendees should adjust for parking challenges in the vicinity of the Statehouse. 
  • Ignatius pays tribute to Khashoggi at ISU
    Washington Post columnist David Ignatius came to Terre Haute to pay tribute to his slain colleague, Indiana State University graduate Jamal Khashoggi. “Jamal was a courageous man who just couldn’t stop telling the truth as he saw it. He knew that he was in danger,” Ignatius said in a Tribune-Star article by Sue Loughlin. Khashoggi wondered “if he should pull back and whether the risk he was taking was just too great,” Ignatius said. No matter the risk, “He was not a man who could suppress what he believed was true.”

    Ignatius said he was "thrilled" to give the first Khashoggi lecture at ISU. “I can’t think of a better way to honor him,” especially since Khashoggi graduated from Indiana State in 1983. He went on to be a probing critic of the Saudi regime and paid for it with his life. 

    Six months earlier to the day, Khashoggi was murdered in the Saudi consulate in Turkey. Ignatius is concerned that American journalists could face a similar fate. For President Trump to describe the press as “the enemy of the people, I find deeply disturbing,” Ignatius said. We couldn't agree more.
    - Brian A. Howey, publisher
  • An arbitrary legislative concoction
    It is perplexing and arbitrary that House Republicans would concoct a $100 million fee to move one of the Gary casinos to Terre Haute. The last time such a scheme took place, Centaur Gaming ended up in bankruptcy. It was a resilient company and not only did it make a full recovery consolidating the two racinos under Hoosier management, it conducted itself as a model corporate citizen (ask local officials in Anderson and Shelbyville), employed thousands of Hoosiers who express on-going loyalty to those managers, paid hundreds of millions in state and local taxes, fostered an expanding equine sector in Indiana agriculture (including the Centaur Equine Specialty Hospital as a component of the Purdue Veterinary Medicine division), and established a philanthropic footprint. 

    Instead of creating onerous obstacles for these businessmen and the cash-strapped cities of Terre Haute and Gary which would benefit greatly, you would think Indiana lawmakers would embrace these proposals and work create an atmosphere for success.
    - Brian A. Howey, publisher
  • Barr reports 'no collusion'; Trump claims 'complete' exoneration

    Attorney General Bill Barr released a four-page memo to Congress mid-Sunday afternoon summarizing the Russia Collusion probe by Special Counsel Robert Mueller, that appears to absolve President Trump, his family and campaign with colluding with the Russians in impacting the 2016 American election.  “The investigation found that neither President Trump nor any of his aides conspired with the Russian government," Barr said. "The Special Counsel . . . did not draw a conclusion — one way or the other — as to whether the examined conduct constituted obstruction. The Special Counsel states that ‘while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him.” "There was no collusion with Russia, no obstruction," President Trump said after landing in Washington from a weekend trip to Mar-A-Lago. "It was a complete and total exoneration. It was a shame our country has had to go through with this. This was an illegal takedown that failed. Hopefully somebody is going to look at the other side." Barr's initial interpretation of the 21-month Mueller probe reinforcing President Trump's oft stated declaration that there was "no collusion" that he has made at MAGA rallies in Indiana and across the nation. Barr added, "For each of the relevant actions investigated, the report sets out evidence on both sides of the question and leave unresolved what the special counsel views as ‘difficult issues’ of law and fact concerning whether the President’s actions and intent could be viewed as obstruction,” Barr wrote.


  • Huston's advice to Trump is to dump Pence, add Haley to the ticket

    Vice President Mike Pence once headed the Indiana Policy Review think tank. On Friday night, members heard a former aide to President Nixon suggested President Trump should replace him on the 2020 ticket with former United Nations ambassador Nikki Haley.

    "My political advice to the president would be that he replace Pence with Nikki Haley," said Indianapolis attorney Tom Huston. "I don't think Pence adds anything to the ticket. He's already said that Pence is going to be on the ticket. Now let me say, I don't like Nikki Haley. But I do think she would bring something to the ticket that would be valuable to him to win reelection." Huston headed the Young Americans for Freedom, a group of young conservatives, before joining the Nixon administration as a speechwriter, then became a special projects aide and forged the controversial "Huston Plan" designed to confront domestic terrorism during the Vietnam War era. Huston was the featured speaker about the state of modern American conservatism.

    President Trump publicly asked Pence to stay on the ticket right after the 2018 election, but media reports had him questioning Pence's loyalty and what he would bring to the reelection bid. Some believe Nikki Haley, the former United Nations Ambassador and South Carolina governor, could help Trump attract female voters. - Brian A. Howey, publisher

  • Gov. Holcomb honors fallen World War II Hoosiers
    Gov. Eric Holcomb visited the Luxembourg American Cemetery during his European trade mission on Tuesday. Among the 159 Hoosiers buried at the Luxembourg American Cemetery are Medal of Honor recipient William McGee and Alex Penkala, a member of Easy Company of the 506th Parachute Infantry, 101st Airborne. Easy Company was featured in the HBO film series "Band of Brothers."

    Also buried there is U.S. Army Gen. George S. Patton Jr., who led the Third Army in the liberation of France, the Low Countries and Germany. On Dec. 26, 1944, Patton drove a spearhead Third Army's 4th Armored Division into Bastogne, ending the siege there. He called the relief of Bastogne "the most brilliant operation we have thus far performed, and it is in my opinion the outstanding achievement of the war. This is my biggest battle." He was killed in a traffic accident on Dec. 21, 1945.

    Last weekend, the Holcomb delegation visited the American cemetery on Omaha Beach, site of the D-Day Invasion. We will never forget our valiant fallen Hoosiers. Ever.
    - Brian A. Howey, publisher
     
  • The collapse of Hoosier journalism continues with demise of NUVO
    The collapse of Indiana journalism continues. NUVO Newsweekly, the alternative newspaper in Indianapolis personified by the late Harrison J. Ullmann, published its last print edition this week. Editor Laura McPhee tweeted, "I’ve done everything in my power not to have to share this news but it has happened. Wednesday’s edition of @NuvoIndy was the last issue of the paper and the staff’s last week of employment. We made it 29 years, and that’s something to be very proud of. I was around for 14 of those years, and have zero regrets. I’m proud of the work we did, the stories we told, and the friendships that will continue to bind us all together."

    This is a significant blow to Indianapolis and its journalism, where the IndyStar has been decimated by budget and staffing cuts and is in severe atrophy (I couldn't even get the Star to renew my subscription). Many other medium-sized newspapers around the state have also experienced flesh and bone staffing cuts and are shells of their former selves.

    Indiana needs a non-profit news foundation that has been developed with the Texas Tribune, the MinnPost in Minnesota, and the Voice of San Diego. Without non-profit journalism in Indiana, the 4th Estate watchdog will recede, and we find corruption filling the void. And ponder this: The parts of the state that has experienced the brunt of the meth and heroin epidemic has come where the once-vibrant press has receded. - Brian A. Howey, HPI publisher, NUVO editor and writer from 1997-2000.
  • Trump's blunders in Vietnam
    The problem with winging it on a nuclear deal is the inevitable disappointment that follows. Nuke talks are considerably more complex than a Manhattan real estate deal. We woke up this morning to watch the collapse of President Trump's second summit with North Korean despot Kim Jong Un. To his credit, Trump opted for dialogue as opposed to the reckless saber rattling we witnessed in 2017, but he did so without the necessary staff and spade work needed for success. "Sometimes you just have to walk," Trump explained. He is correct on that, but he didn't do the proper lower level work that could have yielded some success, so this is a huge missed opportunity.

    So, now what? Park Hyung-joong, head researcher at the Korea Institute of National Unification in Seoul, told ABC News  that this collapse of talks will be seen as a significant blow to the young tyrant. “In North Korea, Chairman Kim is like God. They would think that he has been humiliated by Trump," Park said. "On top of that, Trump left Vietnam right away by plane. But for Kim, he’s got no plane to take off like Trump did. Besides, it took a very long time for him to be in Vietnam.” One can imagine a brooding despot taking the long way home.

    President Trump's other blunder was his acceptance of Kim's explanation on the death of Otto Warmbier, the University of Virginia student who was imprisoned for stealing a poster and returned to Ohio brain dead in 2017, dying soon thereafter. Trump said Kim "felt badly about it. He felt very badly. He tells me that he didn't know about it and I will take him at his word." It is stunning how Trump places any value on the "word" of tyrants. - Brian A. Howey, publisher.
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  • Pence vows to return to the moon on 50th anniversary
    "Standing before you today, I am proud to report, at the direction of the president of the United States of America, America will return to the moon within the next five years, and the next man and the first woman on the moon will be American astronauts. We’re going back." - Vice President Mike Pence, speaking at Cape Canaveral observing the 50th anniversary of NASA astronaut and Purdue graduate Neil Armstrong walking on the moon. Pence is seen here with astronaut Buzz Aldrin, who followed Armstrong on to the moon surface on July 20, 1969.
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  • Epstein, Acosta and the perversion of power
    For those of you wondering why Labor Secretary Alex Acosta resigned Friday despite President Trump's assertion that he is a "great labor secretary," spend 15 minutes to read Miami Herald reporter Julie K. Brown's "Perversion of Justice: How a future Trump Cabinet member gave a serial sex abuser the deal of a lifetime." You'll learn that District Attorney Acosta bowed to the demands of pedophile Jeffrey Epstein's all-star legal team, cut "an extraordinary plea agreement that would conceal the full extent of Epstein’s crimes and the number of people involved." This is about a lurid a tale of crime and power as I've ever read. While this was going on, Epstein's enforcers were tracking down witnesses and journalists, issuing threats.

    Brown writes: "Not only would Epstein serve just 13 months in the county jail, but the deal — called a non-prosecution agreement — essentially shut down an ongoing FBI probe into whether there were more victims and other powerful people who took part in Epstein’s sex crimes." We are learning that Epstein's circles included dozens if not hundreds of underage girls, recruiters, presidents, princes and the rich and famous.

    Florida State Sen. Lauren Book, asks: “Where is the righteous indignation for these women? Where are the protectors? Who is banging down the doors of the secretary of labor, or the judge or the sheriff’s office in Palm Beach County, demanding justice and demanding the right to be heard?"

    Of course President Trump said of Epstein in 2002, “I’ve known Jeff for fifteen years. Terrific guy. He’s a lot of fun to be with. It is even said that he likes beautiful women as much as I do, and many of them are on the younger side." Wink-wink. That was three years before Trump's infamous Access Hollywood comment (if you're rich and famous, "you can grab them by their pussy") and five years before Acosta's plea deal with Epstein. It begs the question, What would Mother think?  - Brian A. Howey, publisher
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