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Friday, September 30, 2022
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Saturday, November 30, 2019 10:04 AM

It appears the impeachment fever on the Potomac has broken, but it may not have come in time to save the Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives.

  • INDIANAPOLIS  – After a troubling and difficult process for pro-lifers, Senate Enrolled Act 1, which limits abortions in Indiana, passed the Legislature and was signed into law late Friday night. To begin with, the original draft of SB1 was a gut punch to the pro-life community. After nearly 50 years of advocating for women and unborn babies who have been harmed and killed by the abortion industry, SB1 had a pro-life veneer but contained policies at odds with pro-life principles and even current law. That context is important because everything that happened from the introduction of SB1 forward was guided by the weak language that started the process. Pro-life legal experts from Indiana and around the nation, along with pro-life Hoosier doctors and medical experts, worked around the clock to recommend language to fix the myriad problems of SB1. Some were adopted, some were not. But SB1 as passed looks very different than when introduced, which is key to acquiescence from the major pro-family groups like Indiana Right to Life and the Indiana Family Institute.
  • INDIANAPOLIS – The recent Supreme Court ruling on abortion provides a remarkable teachable moment for the nation if we will simply pause and ponder what the ruling actually says. Put away abortion politics, set aside any disappointment or joy you might personally feel, and consider the decision’s foundational findings as if it is a civics lessons. That’s a fair reading of the ruling, because every U.S. Supreme Court decision, at its heart, is a civics lesson. In the majority opinion, Justice Samuel Alito declares simply that neither the constitution nor anything in our history or traditions gives the federal government the power to either restrict or encourage abortion. In our federal system, where the national government has limited, enumerated and separated powers, such “silence” means the issue rests with the states and the people. As Justice Brett Kavanaugh put it in a concurring opinion, the Constitution is neutral on abortion – it neither favors nor disadvantages abortion.
  • INDIANAPOLIS  — Court observers tell us the U.S. Supreme Court will hand down a landmark abortion  decision overturning Roe v. Wade any day now.  This observation is based on the unprecedented “leak” of a draft opinion by Justice Samuel Alito declaring that Roe was wrongly decided, because the U.S. Constitution includes no right to abortion. Assuming that legal logic holds, which is a safe assumption as the Court verified the authenticity of Alito’s draft and any substantial departure from it would show the majority was bullied by the leaker, states will soon determine their unique abortion policy. That will be a healthy debate, though full of acrimony. I say healthy because among Roe’s most pernicious progeny is an overall coarsening of the culture as the value of life was diminished. We began America with a heart-felt cry for “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” But post-Roe we dropped “life” for a third of the citizenry, leaving only liberty and the pursuit of happiness. And a libertine culture we have.
  • INDIANAPOLIS – The Dec. 1 arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court in a Mississippi abortion case, coupled with a ruling in a different abortion case from Texas, have seasoned court observers predicting that major changes in abortion policy are coming. While the particulars of each case matter, two overarching observations suggest states will be able to substantially regulate – if not ban – abortions as early as next summer for the first time since 1973. The first observation is that a majority of the same court that decreed abortion is a constitutional right back in 1973 is comfortable with a Texas law that bans abortions after about six weeks of pregnancy. This new Sept. 1 law more than halved abortions in Texas, our nation’s second most populous state. A court committed to continuing its 1973 standard would not allow such a significant variance. The second observation is that the Dec. 1 arguments made clear that a majority of the court is uncomfortable with current vague standards (phrases like viability and undue burden are the core of current edicts), suggesting the whole issue may be upended and sent to the states for unique policy prescriptions reflecting the will of the people in those 50 separate jurisdictions. While we may not know the specifics of the decision until summer, it is not too early to begin to consider what might be different in Indiana and beyond when this potentially landmark ruling is handed down. First, if Roe v. Wade and its subsequent cases are struck down, abortion policy will drastically change.
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  • Morales denies sexual harassment allegations; Wells comments
    "As a husband and father, I understand sexual harassment is deplorable and can leave devastating scars. The claims being made against me are false and I unequivocally deny all of them. The women, who will not reveal their identity, cannot corroborate their stories. They have neither documentation nor sources to substantiate their defaming comments. The falsities stem from 15 years ago and were not brought forward until now. The timing is clearly politically motivated, especially considering one of the women mentions that she is now volunteering for my opponent's campaign. The claims were printed in a publication that uses a disclaimer stating, 'This is a compiliation of pure gossip, rumor and blatant innuendo'. I am appalled to be included in this publication (and) I was not provided an opportunity to respond to these falsehoods before they were printed." Republican Secretary of State nominee Diego Morales, responding to allegations published by Abdul-Hakim Shabazz at IndyPolitics. Democrat nominee Destiny Wells said in a statement: "Diego Morales' victims need to be heard and believed. It takes tremendous courage in coming forward, and the last thing I want is for their personal sacrifice to be for naught. While this race has been focused on safeguarding our right to vote, we too must safeguard a woman's right to exist in the workplace free of sexual harassment and assault. For weeks we have seen mounting evidence that Diego will say and do anything to get what he wants — as Hoosiers, I know this is not in line with our values — we have had enough."
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