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Saturday, December 03, 2016
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Thursday, October 15, 2015 9:20 AM
By BRIAN A. HOWEY
    
INDIANAPOLIS – Gov. Mike Pence kicked off the infrastructure debate with a $1 billion proposal to repair state highways, interstates and bridges. Local government officials want the governor and General Assembly to take it several steps further, and provide what the Indiana Association of Cities & Towns calls a “sustainable” funding source. IACT President Matthew Greller told Howey Politics Indiana on Wednesday that the Pence plan is a good start. “The big thing is it’s good the administration is addressing infrastructure in a very serious way with a very serious proposal and a lot of money. But it includes no money for city and town streets and county roads. I’m disappointed because the vast majority of road miles in Indiana are maintained by local governments.”
  • Trump, Pence rally Carrier jobs, vow to cut taxes, regs
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Donald Trump and Mike Pence began their presidential victory lap at the Carrier plant in Indianapolis Thursday afternoon, claiming credit for saving 1,100 jobs from migrating to Mexico. “United Technologies stepped up,” Trump told workers of a coming $16 million investment or more. “Companies are not going to leave the United States any more without consequences.” “We’re going to be lowering our business tax from 35% to 15%,” President-elect Trump vowed, adding he will take aim at regulations. He noted that 216 new federal regulations have passed in the last eight years, including 53 that impacted the Carrier plant. “We have to have a fair shake.” “I want to let all the other companies to know, there’s no reason to leave any more,” Trump said. “You’re taxes are going to be low and your regulations are going to go. Most of the regulations are nonsense. These companies are not going to be leaving any more. They are not going to be like Carrier, announcing they are leaving.”
  • Holcomb advises legislators of Trump impact on 2017 session
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY
        
    ZIONSVILLE – Governor-elect Eric Holcomb is advising members of the Indiana General Assembly to expect a potential “mid-course correction” in the upcoming session after President-elect Donald Trump takes office. “We find ourselves in this unique situation where governors and legislative leaders are putting together their budgets all over the country, and we have to do that in January, of course,” Holcomb told Howey Politics Indiana in an exclusive interview Sunday at Trader’s Point Creamery. “The president will be sworn in on Jan. 20 and he’ll have some executive orders to tend to that will have an impact on our budgets. His legislative package, and Congress’s will likewise will have implications to our own,” Holcomb said. Calling Trump the delegator-in-chief, Holcomb added, “You’ve got this president-elect who has spent a career in the private sector excelling and he didn’t get there without delegating and hiring good people around him to get the job done. He’s got as his partner and vice president, a Hoosier Mike Pence who understands instinctively that it’s governors who are people closest to citizens who can better get the job done. I look for governors of both parties across the country to seize the day.” What should legislators expect in the next three to six months? “We’re in unprecedented territory,” Holcomb explained.
  • Verma forged health compromises in Indiana
    By MAUREEN HAYDEN
    CNHI Statehouse Bureau

        
    INDIANAPOLIS – Democrat Charlie Brown and Republican Patricia Miller don’t agree on much politically, but a decade ago the lawmakers set out to insure more of the state’s working poor. Joining them was Seema Verma, a consultant steeped in the issue from working with Eskenazi Hospital, which oversees care for the capital city’s poor. The result, said Brown, was a politically palatable compromise that Miller, a former nurse, could sell to her conservative colleagues as a “hand up, not a hand-out” program. Designed in detail by Verma, the novel Healthy Indiana Plan both expanded Medicaid and required those who are newly insured to make small monthly payments for coverage. It also built in incentives for preventative care and to steer patients away from costly emergency rooms. “Verma was the go-to person for everything we needed to know and do. She was the person with all the right answers,” said Miller, now retired, who was chairwoman of the Senate Public Health Committee. On Tuesday, President-elect Donald Trump picked Verma to head the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, where she may push to replicate Indiana’s model in other states as part of a promised overhaul of President Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act.
  • HPI Interview: Holcomb describes his epic 2016 odyssey
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY
        
    ZIONSVILLE – Perhaps you could include Mike Pence and Dan Quayle as Hoosier politicians who have ridden the whirlwind into national prominence. But when it comes to saddling up and literally riding a tornado, that would be Governor-elect Eric “Hickory” Holcomb. He was riding a 100-mph beeline down U.S. 31 as Kokomo lay in tatters. He went from the widely perceived third-place candidate in the U.S. Senate race to becoming lieutenant governor designate last February. He was sworn into office in March, won a Republican primary with Gov. Pence, only to watch the boss ascend to the national ticket on July 15. Eleven days later, he faced an unprecedented Indiana Republican Central Committee caucus to be followed by the “100-day campaign.” He was an underdog in all of these roles.
  • Speaker Bosma cites Hoosier D-Day invader to inspire colleagues
    By THOMAS CURRY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Inspiring his fellow lawmakers with the heroic tale of a Bronze Star Hoosier Normandy invader, the now five term Speaker of the House Brian Bosma laid out his plan for the upcoming session in his leadership acceptance speech. Bosma called the problems facing Indiana “a great challenge and a great opportunity” for the 120th General Assembly and that the leadership shown by the selfless acts of D-Day soldiers provides an example to Indiana lawmakers. “What we do in comparison is easy, don't forget that.” Bosma had the family of Sgt. Julius “Rusty” Houck in the gallery and presented them with American and French flags from Bosma's trip to the Normandy cemetery earlier this year. Houck was killed by German machine gun fire as his 101st Airborne Division D Company sought to disable the final of five big guns bombarding American invaders at Utah Beach on the morning of June 6, or D-Day.
  • Bipartisan support in General Assembly for infrastructure plan
    By THOMAS CURRY

    INDIANAPOLIS - There appears to be bipartisan support for a coming 10-year infrastructure plan, legislative leaders said at the Indiana Chamber of Commerce’s annual preview session. “We are the crossroads of America, we need roads that work,” said Speaker Brian Bosma, who pushed an extensive plan during the 2016 session. Senate President David Long argued that money for improving roads will be an issue and said “it’s inevitable that we find some new sources of money.” He noted that increasing gas and road taxes may be possible as “technology has outpaced our laws. Cars are going much further on a tank of gas than before.”

  • Holcomb names Earl Goode chief of staff
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS -  Gov.-elect Eric Holcomb turned to one of the longest serving chiefs of staff in Indiana history to held lead his administration when he announced the selection of Earl Goode Monday morning. Goode took the helm of Gov. Mitch Daniels administration in his second year from Harry Gonso, serving nearly six and a half years until the governor’s second term expired in 2013. Holcomb served as Goode’s deputy from 2005 until he was named campaign manager for the governor’s 2008 reelection campaign. He returned to the administration after the 2008 election before Daniels named him Republican state chairman. Holcomb described Goode’s appointment as the “most important” one he will make. With Goode seated next to him at today’s transition team meeting at Banker’s Life Fieldhouse, Holcomb added, “I’m thankful to select Earle Goode, having already served as chief of staff, his intellect and insights will be valuable.”
  • HPI Analysis: Shelled Indiana Democrats to listen, seek issues
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY
        
    INDIANAPOLIS – The embers of a horrific Democratic defeat are still smoldering, yet South Bend Mayor Peter Buttigieg senses an opportunity just two years away. “Democrats have to put forward a positive agenda, but we need to have a positive response to those in power,” the second-term Democrat said Tuesday. “What is really extraordinary is we have an incoming president who is not a conservative, not a liberal and not a moderate. It’s going to be more difficult to know in advance what his policies are and what they mean for people in our community, but it may help set our agenda.” In talking with Democrats across Indiana after the Trump/Pence tsunami swept away the gubernatorial, U.S. Senate, attorney general, superintendent of public instruction and viable congressional nominee on Nov. 8, the other obvious bookend to what happens in Washington is what happens in a place like Washington, Indiana.
        
  • Former Sen. Birch Bayh tried to end Electoral College
    By MAUREEN HAYDEN
    CNHI Statehouse Bureau
        

    BLOOMINGTON – Democrat Hillary Clinton apparently won the most votes last week, but she didn’t win the White House, a contradiction that is renewing debate over the system of selecting a president that is baked into the U.S. Constitution. Calls to abolish the Electoral College, which gives some states disproportionate influence, aren’t new. A half-century ago, an Indiana senator took up the cause of reforming how presidents are picked, only to be stymied by an array of forces that included segregationist Sen. Strom Thurmond and the widow of civil rights hero Martin Luther King Jr. The fascinating details of Sen. Birch Bayh’s quixotic attempt to reform, and later topple, the Electoral College are forever preserved in the archives of the Indiana University Libraries.
  • HPI Exclusive: Hale vows to stay involved in policy and politics
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Still rocked by the stunning defeat of Democratic gubernatorial nominee John Gregg, running mate Christina Hale vowed to stay involved in policy and political matters in Indiana. Asked in an exclusive interview Thursday with Howey Politics Indiana if that could include a 2020 gubernatorial candidacy, Hale responded, “Absolutely, yes. I love Indiana and want to make sure that not only does our public discussion stay relevant, but we’re planning for future generations. Indiana is falling behind in some many areas. We had a vision for success, not just to get reelected in four years, but to set up prosperity for the next 10 years.” The Indianapolis Democrat said that while she is planning her next steps professionally, she added, “This experience makes me more determined to have Indiana teed up for the future. We talked about issues that really matter."
  • Ben Quayle says Pence well prepared for transition
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY
        
    INDIANAPOLIS – Former Vice President Dan Quayle was a mentor to a young congressman named Mike Pence. It went to the next generation, when then Rep. Pence helped bring along U.S. Rep. Ben Quayle when he was elected in 2010. So the Arizona Republican has some interesting insights on the towering task facing the Indiana governor. On Friday, President-elect Donald Trump switched gears, installing Vice President-elect Pence to head the transition team, replacing New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. By Tuesday, when the two met at Trump Tower to go over a list of potential appointments, the process was described as in “disarray,” with Christie allies such as former House Intelligence Chairman Mike Rogers abruptly leaving. Some potential cabinet appointees such as Dr. Ben Carson have begged off. NBC News was citing “Stalinesque purges” from the team and Politico called it a “chaotic scramble inside Trump Tower, with competing power centers jockeying for position and influence.” One source described it as an “absolute knife fight.”  One thing is certain, the transition Pence faces will be far different than the one Dan Quayle participated in in 1988 when he was elected with President George H.W. Bush.
  • HPI Analysis: Four days in July that rocked Indiana politics
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY
        
    INDIANAPOLIS – When filing back through time to make sense of the sensational Nov. 8 election that catapulted Gov. Mike Pence into global power and capped Eric Holcomb’s unprecedented rise in Indiana, it comes down to four days in July when the historic and fateful dramas unfolded. On July 14, we witnessed cable breaking news reports of Gov. and Mrs. Pence disembarking on a charter flight from Indianapolis to Teterboro, N.J., in what most thought was an obvious sign he was about to join the Republican presidential ticket with Donald Trump. Except it was not fait accompli. That wouldn’t happen until Friday, July 15. And on Monday July 25, after 22 Indiana Republican Central Committee members migrated back to Indiana from the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, the Holcomb campaign was riding high on endorsements from Pence and legislative leaders and expressing sheer confidence he had the nomination in the bag. But he didn’t. That wouldn’t be secured until a second ballot on July 26.
        
  • Pence's clout could be measured by Hoosiers in the cabinet

    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - Vice President-elect Mike Pence has taken the helm of President-elect Donald Trump’s transition team and has cleansed it of lobbyists from the “swamp.” But the real markers of Pence’s emerging clout could come on how many fellow Hoosiers he can bring into the new government. Multiple media reports say that U.S. Rep. Luke Messer and former Indiana Supt. of Public Instruction Tony Bennett are on the top of the transition team’s list for Department of Education secretary. Politico is reporting that four Hoosiers are on a potential list to head the Agriculture Deparment, Mike McCloskey, a dairy executive; Kip Tom, a farmer who ran for Congress in Indiana this year but was defeated in the primary; Don Villwock, former president of the Indiana Farm Bureau; and Ted McKinney, the current director of the Indiana Department of Agriculture in the Pence Administration. Previous reports had former deputy secretary Chuck Connor on that list. And at EPA, Politico is reporting that Indiana Department of Environmental Management Commissioner Carol Comer is under consideration for an agency that will be squarely in the Trump/Pence bullseye when it comes to chopping back regulations that propagated during the Obama administration.

  • Pence's transition chair yet another rapid rise to the top
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS – There’s that old idiomatic expression, “The cream always rises to the top.” In the context of political power, the current Exhibit A would be snowy-haired Vice President-elect Michael Richard Pence. Over the past four decades, Pence became president of Hanover College’s Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, and 1991 took a similar title with the Indiana Policy Review Foundation, the free-market think tank. Since he finally took the congressional oath of office in January 2001, Pence has seen a steady rise in every governmental institution he has joined. On Friday, President-elect Trump made him chairman of his transition team and that places him at the foot of global power. Pence met with Governor-elect Eric Holcomb this morning at an Indiana Statehouse cabinet meeting to aid and abet a 50th gubernatorial transition in his home state. Pence announced, “I will finish out my term as governor.”
  • Intolerance, protests in wake of Trump/Pence win in Indiana, U.S.
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    NASHVILLE, Ind. - Vice President-elect Mike Pence returned to Indiana late this week to bask in he and Donald Trump’s historic election upset, to reaffirm his commitment to military veterans at Camp Atterbury, and spent Friday night at the Aynes House, the gubernatorial retreat at Brown County State Park. But Indiana, like other points across the nation, was still reverberating from last Tuesday’s election where Trump upset Hillary Clinton. Fourteen miles to the east of Aynes House, in Pence’s hometown of Columbus, Latino students were intimidated by taunts of “build that wall” at one of the local high schools prompting school administrators to intervene. And 16 miles to the west in Bloomington, residents woke up to find swasticas and KKK symbols spray painted on the B-Line trail, an incident the mayor tied directly to the election.

  • Horse Race: Young ends the Bayh dynasty
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY
        
    INDIANAPOLIS – Everyone from the candidate to the gathered media at LePeep Wednesday morning was bleary-eyed, and here was Senator-elect Todd Young talking about the race that just ended the Bayh dynasty and positioned himself to be Indiana’s ninth senator in the television age. It was a mud-splattered contest, and Young was ready to move on. “The atmosphere is polarized,” Young said when asked about building the wall on the Mexican border and deporting millions of illegal immigrants. “I refuse to affix any names, but in too many instances, Americans have been pitted against Americans. That kind of politics needs to end.” Young, like many Hoosier politicians, took a rollercoaster ride through a tornado in 2016. Young won a 52-42% victory over Bayh in a race that pulled emphatically in his favor over the final month. Last July he had just left a coffee shop south of Indianapolis when campaign aide Cam Savage called him. “He said, ‘How’s your day going? Just to let you know, you have a new opponent. Evan Bayh just entered the race.’” Young’s response was, “Carry on. Let’s go.” He immediately went from being a heavy favorite to profound underdog.
  • Hollingsworth, Walorski prevail in 9th, 2nd CDs
    By THOMAS CURRY
        
    INDIANAPOLIS –  The full force of the Donald Trump wave reverberated all throughout Indiana, reaching inland towards the 2nd CD and 9th CD congressional races. The Democratic National Campaign Committee and political pundits had pegged these races as potential upsets for the Democrats but each candidate managed to only win one county in their district. The losses prove that Indiana Democrats have a long way to go in making inroads towards flipping seats from Red to Blue. For Republicans Rep. Jackie Walorski and political newcomer Trey Hollingsworth, it was an easy coast to victory despite the close polling and feel of the campaigns heading into election day. In the 9th CD, Hollingsworth culminated his first journey into politics with a 54.1% to 40.5% victory over Democrat Shelli Yoder. Hollingsworth was a late entry into the Republican primary and survived a crowded field despite being given low odds and being labeled “Tennessee Trey.”
  • Trump's Hoosier voters kept coming out of the woodwork

    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS – The Trump supporters, well, they kept coming out of the woodwork. During Rex Early and the Trump Indiana campaign’s 50 Indiana county tour over the past six weeks, people kept turning up that had never voted, had never been a part of the process. When the Trump campaign had an event in Edinburgh with Gov. Mike Pence’s brother Greg and wife Denise, campaign vice chairman Tony Samuel met a man named Danny. “He said that in 41 years, he was registered to vote but never voted,” Samuel said. “He said he was waiting for someone like Trump.” In Marion, Samuel said, “I met a guy named Carl, who had never registered in 62 years. And there were another 12 to 15 guys in the room just like him.” On Tuesday, the Hoosiers who had for decades been outside the political process came out of the woodwork like a hornet swarm. “These were all new people,” Samuel said. “We knew it would be that way all across the country.”
  • HPI Analysis: Holcomb rides Trump/Pence surge in Indiana
    By BRIAN A. HOWEY
        
    INDIANAPOLIS – If you take the October WTHR/Howey Politics Indiana Poll and the Nov. 1-3 final survey and draw a trend line, what you end up with in the Indiana gubernatorial race is a 51-45 upset victory by Eric Holcomb over Democrat John Gregg. In our September survey, Gregg had a 40-35% lead over Holcomb. In the October survey Gregg was up just 41-39%. And in the November edition, it was tied at 42%, with the Trump/Pence momentum beginning to build. The presidential ticket went from 43-38% in October to a 48-37% lead over Hillary Clinton in early November. It was a precursor to a tidal wave, an inverse tsunami, that was agitated by the Oct. 28 letter from FBI Director James Comey, tearing off Clinton’s email fiasco scab. It decimated Indiana Democrats. Early Wednesday morning, Lt. Gov. Holcomb spoke to Gov. Mike Pence on the phone and quickly found President-elect Donald Trump on the line. “Certainly I expressed to him last night that he drew people out to vote who had never voted before,” Holcomb said Wednesday afternoon when he announced his transition team.
  • Young ends Bayh dynasty in emerging Trump/Pence IN surge

    By BRIAN A. HOWEY

    INDIANAPOLIS - What was once unthinkable became reality on Tuesday night as Republican Todd Young has defeated Democrat Evan Bayh for the U.S. Senate. He becomes, perhaps, the first victim of what appears to be an emphatic surge by the Donald Trump/Mike Pence ticket in the Hoosier state. It is the culmination of a twisting race where Bayh, the former two-term senator and governor, nudged nominee Baron Hill out in July, arriving with the $10 million war chest he had hoarded for half a decade.  Overnight Young went from a big money advantage over Hill to an almost 10-to-1 money disadvantage and Bayh’s campaign released internal polling showing he had almost a 20% lead. And then, with the Citizens United Supreme Court decision looming large, tens of millions of dollars began to flow in for Young via the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the National Rifle Association and Mitch McConnell’s Senate Leadership Fund. It quickly leveled the playing field.

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  • Daniels calls on Trump to tackle the $14 trillion in national debt
    “It is an enormous impediment to long-term growth in this country. The president-elect didn’t cause this problem, but I think he is that president for whom it will not wait another four years. I’ve said in at least two presidential election cycles, this country cannot wait out another presidency without getting serious about this problem. I’m pretty sure I’m right this time.” - Purdue President Mitch Daniels, calling on President-elect Donald Trump to tackle the $14 trillion national debt. Daniels made his comments as one of three co-chairs of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, a nonpartisan budget watchdog group. In 2011 as the former White House budget director positioned for the 2012 presidential race, Daniels cited the "great red menace" of national debt in a speech to CPAC, then wrote about the topic in his book "Keeping The Republic."
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HPI Video Feed
Pence lauds Carrier deal
Gov. Mike Pence talks about the Carrier jobs deal with Scott Pelley on CBS.

President-elect Trump's Thanksgiving video
President-elect Donald Trump outlines plans for his coming administration in this Thanksgiving video.

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Trump taxes

Should Donald Trump release recent tax returns, like every major party nominee has done over the past 40 years?


 




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