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Monday, January 23, 2017
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The Trump and Jackson inaugurals in 2017 and 1829.
The Trump and Jackson inaugurals in 2017 and 1829.
Saturday, January 21, 2017 4:16 PM
By BRIAN A. HOWEY

NASHVILLE, Ind. – To the Eastern elites and the Washington insiders, President Donald Trump’s inaugural address on Friday was described as everything from “dreadful” by George Will, to alarming, authoritarian, bombastic and brooding. But to many Hoosiers, with some 57% of them voting for Trump on Nov. 8, it was sweet tonic, conjuring up imagery from the days of President Andrew Jackson, a populist man of the people who carried Indiana’s five Electoral College votes three times as the state began filling in to the north, while sending its native American population into exile. Indiana was a distinctly Jacksonian state with deep distrust of Washington and central authority. By the 21st Century, the state had more than 11,000 elected officials, reflecting an inherent distrust of the executive elites.

“For too long, a small group in our nation’s capital has reaped the rewards of government while the people have borne the cost,” Trump said as a light rain began to fall. “Washington flourished, but the people did not share in its wealth. Politicians prospered, but the jobs left, and the factories closed. The establishment protected itself, but not the citizens of our country. Their victories have not been your victories; their triumphs have not been your triumphs; and while they celebrated in our nation’s capital, there was little to celebrate for struggling families all across our land.”

Cameras showed former Presidents Obama, George W. Bush and Jimmy Carter grimacing, as did the assembled Washington establishment.

Trump advisor Steve Bannon told the Washington Post that Trump’s address was "an unvarnished declaration of the basic principles of his populist and kind of nationalist movement. I don't think we've had a speech like that since Andrew Jackson came to the White House."

In President Jackson’s 1829 inaugural address, he began, “About to undertake the arduous duties that I have been appointed to perform by the choice of a free people, I avail myself of this customary and solemn occasion to express the gratitude which their confidence inspires, and to acknowledge the accountability which my situation enjoins. While the magnitude of their interests convinces me that no thanks can be adequate to the honor they have conferred, it admonishes me that the best return I can make is the zealous dedication of my humble abilities to their service and their good.”
  • REP. YOUNG TO POST $1M FOR QUARTER: Just days before he makes a presumptive Republican U.S. Senate bid official, U.S. Rep. Todd Young scorched the fundraising circuit, preparing to post $1,024,908 for the second quarter (Howey, Howey Politics Indiana).

     

    HARRISON QUALIFIES FOR INDY MAYORAL BALLOT: Rev. Charles Harrison is now prepared to throw an interesting wrench into the Indianapolis mayoral race (Howey Politics Indiana). Allies of the United Methodist pastor filed more than 6,600 signatures to gain ballot access as an independent last week. Sources with the Marion County Voter Registration have confirmed 3,200 signatures, with another 150 pages yet to be counted, meaning Harrison qualifies for ballot access.

     

    DAILY WIRE RESENT DUE TO TECHNICAL GLITCH: We are resending today’s HPI Daily Wire due to technical glitches. We apologize for the inconvenience.

     

    SANDERS SURGE WORRIES CLINTON CAMPAIGN: The ample crowds and unexpectedly strong showing garnered by Senator Bernie Sanders are setting off worry among advisers and allies of Hillary Rodham Clinton, who believe the Vermont senator could overtake her in Iowa polls by the fall and even defeat her in the nation’s first nominating contest there (New York Times).

     

    INDIANA TEACHER POOL DRYING UP; ‘POLITICIANS’ BLAMED: School leaders in south-central Indiana are reporting that the number of applicants they get for teaching positions has declined in recent years (Ladwig, Greensburg Daily News). They blame primarily state funding constraints, which depress teacher wages, and a blame-the-teachers mentality of politicians and the media, which is pushing teachers out of the profession and prompting fewer high school grads to consider teaching an attractive career. Budd said that the number of applicants has declined especially for math, sciences and foreign languages. “It has become a real struggle,” Budd said. “The pool of applicants is definitely dried up.”

     

    TEACHING LICENSES DOWN 88%: Annual state data reveal that the number of teaching licenses the state issues has fallen a whopping 88 percent in the last six years (Greensburg Daily News). According to the Indiana Department of Education, the state issued in the 2007/08 school year about 7,500 teaching licenses. In 2013/14, the most recent year for which data were available, the state issued just 934 licenses.

     

    GM REBUFFS FIAT/CHRYSLER MERGER: John Elkann, chairman of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV and scion of Italy’s Agnelli family, isn’t giving up on forging a partnership with General Motors Co. , despite being rebuffed by his Detroit rival twice in the past four years (Wall Street Journal).

     

    ZODY WANTS DETAILS ON CANCELED PORTER-NOVELLI CONTRACT: Indiana Democrats have sent the Republican Pence administration a formal request to release documents showing what the state got for its money when it hired a New York public relations firm to deal with the damage inflicted by a new religious objections law (Associated Press). Indiana Democratic Party Chairman John Zody said Monday that he wants Gov. Mike Pence's office to release contracts, messages and emails related to the agreement with Porter Novelli.

     

    HPI DAILY ANALYSIS: Hoosier taxpayers paid $365,000 to the New York PR firm Porter Novelli to repair the state’s post RFRA damage. We ought to be able to see what we paid for. Remember, Public Servants (this includes you, IEDC), you work for us, the taxpayers. - Brian A. Howey

     

    CLICK HERE TO READ TODAY'S FULL HPI DAILY WIRE.

  • By BRIAN A. HOWEY
        
    INDIANAPOLIS – Seated in Indiana House Speaker Brian Bosma’s law offices overlooking Monument Circle, the first question posed during this interview was about the pending immigration bill facing Congress.
        
    “This is what’s on my mind,” Bosma interjected. “The contrast between Washington, D.C., and the state of Indiana. Let me wax philosophical.”
        
    Subsequently, the pundit recognized the Speaker from Indianapolis.
        
    Bosma then produced a prodigious stack of paper, which turned out to be the Indiana House agendas dating back to 2002 when he was minority leader. The stack was more than a half foot thick.
        
    “My frustration is with the way Washington handles issues because I had to talk recently, at one event, about the differences in Indiana 10 years ago and today,” Bosma said. “To do that, I keep copious electronic and paper files. I had a giant file in my desk drawer that said ‘prior agendas.’ And I pulled out our ‘New Direction’ agenda that our team put together in 2002. It said what we were going to do, it said why we needed to do it. And it told the story about what was really a dysfunctional state government, a dysfunctional economy, and dysfunctional fiscal house and it pledged to make a difference.”
        
    There followed a litany of Bosma-produced agendas: In 2009 it was “Moving Indiana Forward.” In 2010, it was the “Taxpayer Protection Plan.” In 2011, the “Strength in Indiana Pledge.”
      
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  • Conway cites 'alternative facts' over inaugural attendance
    "You're saying it's a falsehood, and Sean Spicer, our press secretary, gave alternative facts to that.” - Kellyanne Conway, advisor to President Trump, to NBC’s Meet The Press when pressed by host Chuck Todd on press secretary Sean Spicer’s assertion that Friday’s inauguration had the “largest audience ever.” Spicer had scolded reporters for trying to “lessen the enthusiasm of the inauguration.” Aerial photos show fewer people on the mall on Friday than President Obama’s 2009 inaugural. But there are also reports that about three million more people watched the inauguration on TV and internet platforms.
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President Trump's Inaugural Address
President Trump's inaugural address.

Trump walks Inaugural parade route
President Trump walks the inaugural parade route with his wife and son.

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Trump taxes

Should Donald Trump release recent tax returns, like every major party nominee has done over the past 40 years?


 




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