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Monday, February 20, 2017
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  • INDIANAPOLIS – This may seem like incredibly poor form, but I want to thank Omar Mateen for helping to further expose the broken politics of Washington, as a renewed and overdue debate over our civil rights took place this week.  If only the deaths of 49 innocents at an Orlando night club had not had to occur for this illuminating discussion to unfold.  If having followed the news this week you do not recognize the above description, it is because a great many citizens and our elected leaders in Washington – in the Obama administration and the U.S. Senate, particularly – have failed to comprehend the true nature of the debate in which they are engaged. And, having failed to comprehend it, they have engaged in a bonfire of inanities which has spread across the news media, cable talkshow gabblers, and so-called “social” media (which once again proves itself to be downright anti-social when controversies arise).  The question is not whether we want to prevent the next terrorist attack or mass shooting. Nor is it a question of whether the event in Orlando that Mateen perpetrated was a terrorist attack or a mass shooting. The obvious, inarguable (one would hope) answers to these questions is “of course, we do” and “of course, it was.” The real question, as President Obama has put it, is what kind of country do we want to be? 
  • INDIANAPOLIS – So, the stage is set for the November presidential election. In a nation of 320 million people, the best the two major political parties have to offer is a pair of morally vapid megalomaniacs who will spend the next several months scratching and clawing at each other in a very, very nasty national election. That’s the only rock-solid prediction one can make at this stage of Trump vs. Hillary. All the rest is informed speculation. Generally, presidential elections can be predicted by looking at the demographics and historical voting patterns of individual states, their heft in the Electoral College, the incumbent president’s approval rating, and the state of the national economy. Not in 2016, however. Politically speaking, America has stepped through the looking glass. This time last year, pundits were dismissing Donald Trump as a non-serious candidate who was running to boost his own ego and brand. They were right, but he won the GOP nomination anyway. Hillary Clinton was the odds-on favorite to win her party’s nomination – the term “coronation” was heard more than once – but none in the pundit class predicted the durability of Bernie Sanders, whose arithmetically challenged supporters (nothing in life is “free”) helped him chalk up victories right through this week’s primaries. 
  • MONTICELLO, Ind. – I know, I know; you want to read another piece on Donald Trump about as much as I want to write one, but grant this one accommodation to our shared political reality. We’re going to be hearing and seeing and reading A LOT about “The Donald” over the next six months as he heads first to the GOP convention in Cleveland this summer and then to televised debates this fall with Hillary Clinton. Buckle up, buttercup, it’s going to be a wild, wild ride. Grant this as well; all of the political soothsayers, all of the yammering heads on TV, all of the campaign pros, even the new class of predictive political data geek-demigod-gurus (e.g., Nate Silver), got Trump’s rise wrong, dead wrong. Their conventional wisdom told us that Trump would never be the Republican nominee, so we need not worry about this boorish ignoramus becoming the next leader of the free world. Wrong. Dead wrong. Worry is of no use at this time. 
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  • Senate shocker: Votes down appointed school chief bill; House approves
    "As we add on another appointment this will take away another opportunity for voters to participate in the process." - Sen. Eddie Melton, D-Merrillville, after the Indiana Senate surprisingly voted down SB 179 by a 26-23 vote Monday afternoon. SB 179 which would create a gubernatorial elected education secretary that would replace the elected superintendent of public instruction. The House voted 68-29 for HB 1005, a similar bill. It is a priority of Gov. Eric Holcomb, Speaker Brian Bosma and Senate President David Long and had the backing of Republican Supt. Jennifer McCormick, who upset Supt. Glenda Ritz in 2016. Indiana actually elects more public officials than most other states, with more than 9,000 positions at state and local levels. The Republican leaders favored the appointed position after former Gov. Mike Pence and Ritz sparred frequently over the past four years.
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  • Our response to the press as an 'enemy of the American people'

    Over the past four decades, I have been a committed Hoosier journalist, motivated as a career, but primarily as a steward of our community, state and nation, serving readers with fact, analysis and commentary. My career goal has been to leave a better Indiana and America than when I found it. Eleven of those years I reported and edited for the Elkhart Truth, adding an extra incentive for accuracy. Throughout our state, there are hundreds of committed journalists who strive for the same standards.

    So it is alarming as well as disheartening that President Trump would brand us an “enemy of the American people.” It comes after previous presidential assaults aimed at the very institutions that have made America the greatest nation in history: Our judiciary, our intelligence services, and our political parties. President Trump reveals a staggering dimension of ignorance with this reckless rhetoric, and sets off alarms that his authoritarian bent will fundamentally change this great nation.

    I keep coming back to Purdue President Mitch Daniels’ book, “Keeping the Republic,” echoing a fork in the road assessment of Founding Father Benjamin Franklin, who was asked what kind of nation will we be? He responded, “A republic, if you can keep it.” We now find ourselves at a similar junction. The stewards of the press, three branches of government, an array of civic institutions and our citizens are faced with the arduous task of defending more than two centuries of tradition, now under assault from what appears to be a president who either lacks a fundamental grasp of our guiding concepts and principles, or who seeks to pervert them. - Brian A. Howey, publisher of Howey Politics Indiana

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HPI Video Feed
President Trump's Feb. 16 Press Conference
President Trump's Feb. 16, 2017 White House press conference via Fox News.

Pence kept in dark about Flynn, Russians
NBC News reports on how Vice President Pence was kept out of the loop on Michael Flynn's contacts with the Russians.

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Trump taxes

Should Donald Trump release recent tax returns, like every major party nominee has done over the past 40 years?


 




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